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Introducing First and Second Generation Biofuels into GTAP Data Base version 7


  • Taheripour, Farzad
  • Wally Tyner


The first version of GTAP-BIO Data Base was built based on the GTAP standard data base version 6 which represents the world economy in 2001 (Taheripour et al., 2007). That data base covers global production, consumption, and trade of the first generation of biofuels including ethanol from grains (eth1), ethanol from sugarcane (eth2), and biodiesel (biod) from oilseeds in 2001. Version 7 of GTAP Data Base, which depicts the world economy in 2004, is now published (Narayanan, B.G. and T.L. Walmsley, 2008). However, this standard data base does not include biofuel industries explicitly. The first objective of this research memorandum is to introduce the first generation of biofuels into this new data base. To accomplish this task we will follow Taheripour et al. (2007). The rapid expansion of the first generation of biofuels in the past decades has raised important concerns related to food-fuel competition, land use change, and other economic and environmental issues. These issues have increased interest in the second generation of biofuels which can be produced from cellulosic materials such as dedicated crops, agricultural and forest residues, and waste materials. To examine the economic and environmental consequences of the second generation of biofuels, a CGE model is an appropriate and essential instrument. A data base which presents the first and second generation of biofuels will facilitate research in this field. Hence the second objective of this research memorandum is to expand the space of biofuel alternatives to the second generation. Given that advanced cellulosic biofuels are not yet commercially viable, we used the most up to date information in this area to define the production technologies for these industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Taheripour, Farzad & Wally Tyner, 2011. "Introducing First and Second Generation Biofuels into GTAP Data Base version 7," GTAP Research Memoranda 3477, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  • Handle: RePEc:gta:resmem:3477
    Note: GTAP Research Memorandum No. 21

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jevgenijs Steinbuks & Thomas W. Hertel, 2016. "Confronting the Food–Energy–Environment Trilemma: Global Land Use in the Long Run," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(3), pages 545-570, March.
    2. Cai, Yongyang & Steinbuks, Jevgenijs & Elliott, Joshua & Hertel, Thomas W., 2014. "The effect of climate and technological uncertainty in crop yields on the optimal path of global land use," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7009, The World Bank.
    3. Taheripour, Farzad & Tyner, Wallace E., 2014. "Shale oil and gas booms: Consequences for agricultural and biofuel industries," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170238, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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