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The relationship between religion and fertility: Evidence from Austria

  • Guido Heineck

    ()

Data from the Austrian Family and Fertility Survey are used to examine for the first time the contemporary relationship between religion and fertility in first unions in Austria. Although Austria is a Catholic country, results from a Poisson hurdle model show that both women s denominational affiliation and religiosity affect the number of children born. Unions religious composition does not result in clear evidence. There furthermore is mainly no effect of religion on the timing of births. There however is a puzzle: Females and unions of other than Catholic or no religious affiliation have a higher transition rate to third birth.

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File URL: http://www.ugr.es/~teoriahe/RePEc/gra/paoner/per06_01.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada. in its series Papers on Economics of Religion with number 06/01.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 31 Jan 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gra:paoner:06/01
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  1. Lehrer, Evelyn L, 1996. "Religion as a Determinant of Marital Fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 173-96, May.
  2. Lundberg, S. & Pollak, R.A., 1991. "Separate Spheres Bargaining and the Marriage Market," Working Papers 91-08, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  3. Adsera, Alicia, 2004. "Marital Fertility and Religion: Recent Changes in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 1399, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Maria Melkersson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2000. "Modeling female fertility using inflated count data models," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 189-203.
  5. William Mosher & David Johnson & Marjorie Horn, 1986. "Religion and fertility in the United States: The importance of marriage patterns and hispanic origin," Demography, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 367-379, August.
  6. Mullahy, John, 1986. "Specification and testing of some modified count data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 341-365, December.
  7. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-87, December.
  8. Kevin McQuillan, 2004. "When Does Religion Influence Fertility?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(1), pages 25-56.
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