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Measurment and Mismeasurement of Social Indicators

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Listed:
  • Strauss, J
  • Thomas, D

Abstract

Measurement of social indicators is not without its pitfalls, however, and drawing conclusions based on comparisons of national aggregates is fraught with difficulties, especially when data sources are sketchy. The paper in that issue make a compelling argument for investing in improving the quality - and frequency - of data-collection efforts. However, even when "good" survey data do exist, serious and often quite subtle issues of comparability and measurmenet still abound.

Suggested Citation

  • Strauss, J & Thomas, D, 1996. "Measurment and Mismeasurement of Social Indicators," Papers 96-15, RAND - Reprint Series.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:randrs:96-15
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard T. Curtin & Thomas Juster & James N. Morgan, 1989. "Survey Estimates of Wealth: An Assessment of Quality," NBER Chapters,in: The Measurement of Saving, Investment, and Wealth, pages 473-552 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Francine D. Blau & John W. Graham, 1990. "Black-White Differences in Wealth and Asset Composition," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 321-339.
    3. Hubbard, R Glenn & Skinner, Jonathan & Zeldes, Stephen P, 1995. "Precautionary Saving and Social Insurance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 360-399, April.
    4. Terrell, Henry S, 1971. "Wealth Accumulation of Black and White Families: The Empirical Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 26(2), pages 363-377, May.
    5. Sobol, Marion Gross, 1979. "Factors Influencing Private Capital Accumulation on the "Eve of Retirement"," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(4), pages 585-593, November.
    6. Wolff, Edward N, 1992. "Changing Inequality of Wealth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 552-558, May.
    7. Andrew B. Abel, 1984. "Bequests and Social Security With Uncertain Lifetimes," NBER Working Papers 1372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Smith, James P & Welch, Finis R, 1989. "Black Economic Progress after Myrdal," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 27(2), pages 519-564, June.
    9. James P. Smith, 2004. "Assets and Labor Supply," Labor and Demography 0404003, EconWPA.
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    Cited by:

    1. Murrugarra, Edmundo, 2011. "Employability and productivity among older workers : apolicy framework and evidence from Latin America," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 63230, The World Bank.
    2. Filmer,Deon P., 2002. "Fever and its treatment among the more and less poor in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2798, The World Bank.
    3. Harkness, Susan, 2004. "Social and Political Indicators of Human Well-being," WIDER Working Paper Series 033, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. World Bank, 2001. "Kosovo : Poverty Assessment, Volume 2," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15440, The World Bank.
    5. Coneus, Katja & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2012. "The intergenerational transmission of health in early childhood—Evidence from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 89-97.
    6. Sunder, Marco, 2011. "Upward and onward: High-society American women eluded the antebellum puzzle," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 165-171, March.
    7. Deon Filmer & Kinnon Scott, 2012. "Assessing Asset Indices," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 359-392, February.
    8. Dasgupta, Aparajita, 2014. "Systematic Measurement Error in Self-Reported Health: Is anchoring vignettes the way out?," MPRA Paper 58722, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Lars Osberg & Jiaping Shao & Kuan Xu, 2009. "The growth of poor children in China 1991–2000: why food subsidies may matter," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S1), pages 89-108, April.
    10. Katja Coneus & C. Katharina Spieß, 2010. "Pollution Exposure and Infant Health: Evidence from Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 312, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    11. Duncan Thomas & Elizabeth Frankenberg, 2001. "The Measurement and Interpretation of Health in Social Surveys," Working Papers 01-06, RAND Corporation.
    12. M. Agovino, 2014. "What are the main explanations of occupational diseases and accidents at work in the agricultural sector? A panel analysis for Italian regional data," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 1045-1073, March.
    13. Francesco Cinnirella & Marc Piopiunik & Joachim Winter, 2010. "Why Does Height Matter for Educational Attainment? Evidence from German Pre-Teen Children," CESifo Working Paper Series 2983, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. Chaudhury, Nazmul & Hammer, Jeffrey & Murrugarra, Edmundo, 2003. "The effects of a fee-waiver program on health care utilization among the poor : evidence from Armenia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2952, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    METHODOLOGY ; DATA COLLECTING ; DATA ANALYSIS;

    JEL classification:

    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs

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