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Relationship Investing: Large Shareholder Monitoring with Managerial Cooperation

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  • N. K. Chidambaran
  • John Kose

Abstract

We characterize conditions under which a large institutional shareholder and the manager of a firm will establish relationship investing, wherein the manager actively cooperates with the institution in the monitoring process, to resolve agency problems. The setting of our model is that of a privately informed manager choosing between a project that has a faster resolution of uncertainty and a project that has a delayed resolution of uncertainty. The agency problem arises because the manager has incentives to focus on the firm's perceived market value, rather than its true long-term value, through his compensation contract and leads to investment distortions. We show that relationship investing solves the agency problem and reduces the free-riding problem associated with large shareholder monitoring. We also show that under some conditions it is optimal for shareholders to make the manager's compensation more distortionary by increasing the manger's incentives to focus on the firm's perceived market value, in order to induce him to cooperate in the monitoring process.

Suggested Citation

  • N. K. Chidambaran & John Kose, 1998. "Relationship Investing: Large Shareholder Monitoring with Managerial Cooperation," New York University, Leonard N. Stern School Finance Department Working Paper Seires 98-044, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business-.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:nystfi:98-044
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    File URL: http://www.stern.nyu.edu/fin/workpapers/wpa98044.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Ernst Maug, 1998. "Large Shareholders as Monitors: Is There a Trade-Off between Liquidity and Control?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(1), pages 65-98, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Huang, Kershen & Petkevich, Alex, 2016. "Corporate bond pricing and ownership heterogeneity," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 54-74.
    2. Hoang Luong Luong & Huong Giang (Lily) Nguyen & Xiangkang Yin, 2015. "When Is a Firm's Information Asymmetry Priced? The Role of Institutional Investors," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 55-88, March.
    3. repec:wsi:rpbfmp:v:17:y:2014:i:02:n:s021909151450009x is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gillan, Stuart L. & Starks, Laura T., 2000. "Corporate governance proposals and shareholder activism: the role of institutional investors," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 275-305, August.
    5. Doris Neuberger, 2005. "What’s Common to Relationship Banking and Relationship Investing? Reflections within the Contractual Theory of the Firm," Finance 0510001, EconWPA.
    6. Stuart L. Gillan & Laura T. Starks, 2007. "The Evolution of Shareholder Activism in the United States," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 19(1), pages 55-73.
    7. Doris Neuberger, 2005. "What’s Common to Relationship Banking and Relationship Investing? Reflections within the Contractual Theory of the Firm," Finance 0503001, EconWPA.
    8. Alexander Reisz, 1999. "Temporal Resolution of Uncertainty, the Investment Policy of Levered Firms and Corporate Debt Yields," New York University, Leonard N. Stern School Finance Department Working Paper Seires 99-044, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business-.
    9. Ting Luo & Zhiguo Xiao, 2015. "Selective Disclosure Associated with Institutional Investors: Evidence Based on Chinese Stock Market," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 16(2), pages 515-542, November.
    10. Doris Neuberger, 2005. "What’s Common to Relationship Banking and Relationship Investing? Reflections within the Contractual Theory of the Firm," Finance 0510003, EconWPA.

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