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Generational Accounting and intergenerational Welfare

Author

Listed:
  • Rafflhuschen, B.
  • Risa, A.E.

Abstract

We investigate the intergenerational welfare implications of Generational Accounting when it is used as the basis of intertemporal fiscal policy decisions. In particular, we consider an economy with a PAYGO social security system out of steady state due to a permanent fall in fertility.

Suggested Citation

  • Rafflhuschen, B. & Risa, A.E., 1997. "Generational Accounting and intergenerational Welfare," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 164, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:bereco:164
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Holger Bonin & Joan Gil & Concepció Patxot, 2001. "Beyond the Toledo agreement: the intergenerational impact of the Spanish Pension Reform," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 111-130.
    2. Holger Bonin & Concepció Patxot & Guadalupe Souto, 2014. "Cyclically‐Neutral Generational Accounting," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 35, pages 117-137, June.
    3. SHIMASAWA Manabu & OGURO Kazumasa, 2016. "Will Abenomics Save Future Generations?," Discussion papers 16100, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. Christian Hagist & Norbert Klusen & Andreas Plate & Bernd Raffelhüschen, 2005. "Social Health Insurance - the Major Driver of Unsustainable Fiscal Policy?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1574, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Bonin, Holger, 2001. "Fiskalische Effekte der Zuwanderung nach Deutschland - Eine Generationenbilanz," IZA Discussion Papers 305, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Volker Börstinghaus & Georg Hirte, 2001. "Generational Accounting versus Computable General Equilibrium," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 58(3), pages 227-227, July.
    7. Veronika Deeg & Christian Hagist & Stefan Moog, 2009. "The fiscal outlook in Austria: an evaluation with Generational Accounts," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 36(4), pages 475-499, November.
    8. Poul Schou & Daniel le Maire & Steen Jørgensen, 2005. "Poor parents, rich children? - A hundred years of distribution," DREAM Working Paper Series 200501, Danish Rational Economic Agents Model, DREAM.
    9. Janusz Jablonowski & Christoph Mueller & Bernd Raffelhüschen, 2011. "A fiscal outlook for Poland using Generational Accounts," NBP Working Papers 85, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    10. Svend E. Hougaard Jensen & Ulrik Nødgaard & Lars Haagen Pedersen, 2004. "Fiscal Sustainability and Generational Burden Sharing in Denmark," DREAM Working Paper Series 200401, Danish Rational Economic Agents Model, DREAM.
    11. Svend E.. Hougaard Jensen & Bernd Raffelhuschen & Willi Leibfritz, 1999. "Public Debt, Welfare Reforms, and Intergenerational Distribution of Tax Burdens in Denmark," NBER Chapters,in: Generational Accounting around the World, pages 219-238 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Bonin, Holger, 2002. "Eine fiskalische Gesamtbilanz der Zuwanderung nach Deutschland," IZA Discussion Papers 516, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    FISCAL POLICY ; SOCIAL SECURITY;

    JEL classification:

    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General

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