IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/tmddps/32.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does trade liberalization enhance income growth and equity in Zimbabwe?: the role of complimentary policies

Author

Listed:
  • Bautista, Romeo M.
  • Lofgren, Hans
  • Thomas, Marcelle

Abstract

Using an agriculture-focused CGE model for Zimbabwe with 1991 as base period, this paper examines quantitatively the income and equity effects of trade liberalization in isolation and in conjunction with potentially complementary changes in fiscal and land policies. Trade policy reform alone (dismantling of import and foreign exchange controls, and reduction of import taxes to a low uniform rate) is shown to increase aggregate disposable household income significantly. However, the least income gain accrues to smallholder farm households, which account for about four-fifths of the poor in Zimbabwe, so the equity impact is unfavorable. Concurrent implementation with specific changes in government expenditure and tax policies and two alternative stylized land redistribution schemes yields differing outcomes in terms of aggregate household income growth and its distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Bautista, Romeo M. & Lofgren, Hans & Thomas, Marcelle, 1998. "Does trade liberalization enhance income growth and equity in Zimbabwe?: the role of complimentary policies," TMD discussion papers 32, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:32
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/tmdp32.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jaime de Melo & Sherman Robinson, 2015. "Trade Policy And Resource Allocation In The Presence Of Product Differentiation," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Modeling Developing Countries' Policies in General Equilibrium, chapter 16, pages 357-365 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Margaret Chitiga & Tonia Kandiero & Ramos Mabugu, 2005. "Computable General Equilibrium Micro-Simulation Analysis of the Impact of Trade Policies on Poverty in Zimbabwe," Working Papers MPIA 2005-01, PEP-MPIA.
    2. Margaret Chitiga & Ramos Mabugu & Tonia Kandiero, 2007. "The impact of tariff removal on poverty in Zimbabwe: A computable general equilibrium microsimulation," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 1105-1125.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:32. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.