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Case study on IFPRI and conditional cash transfer (CCT) and non-conditional cash ransfer (NCCT) programs:

Author

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  • Behrman, Jere R.
  • Calderon, Maria Cecilia

Abstract

The objective of this study is to attempt to characterize the apparent influence and impact of IFPRI in relation to evaluation of conditional cash transfers (CCT) and non-conditional cash transfers (NCCT) programs, in both cases including both programs in which IFPRI was involved in the evaluations and programs in which IFPRI was not involved in the evaluations. This effort is a broader effort related to a previous study on the IFPRI influence on one particular influential CCT program, the Mexican PROGRESA / Oportunidades program, which concluded that IFPRI had substantial impact with a high benefit-to-cost ratio. The greater breadth in this study comes at the cost of less depth. The paper first discusses some preliminaries: (1) definitions of CCT and NCCT programs, and (2) the challenges in assessing the influence and impact of IFPRI on and through such programs. It then presents a tabulated database of CCT and NCCT programs that includes 17 characteristics for 41 CCT and 36 NCCT programs worldwide. Next, it presents the meta-description of IFPRI�s role in international learning about these programs based on (1) Google Scholar searches and (2) e-mail interviews with selected key informants for all of the CCT and NCCT programs included in the data base. Six groups of e-mails similar in spirit were written to: (1) key informants in CCT programs for which IFPRI was involved in the evaluation, (2) key informants in CCT programs for which IFPRI was not involved in the evaluation, (3) key informants for NCCT programs in which IFPRI was involved in evaluations, (4) key informants for NCCT programs in which IFPRI was not involved in evaluations, (5) key informants for the PROGRESA / Oportunidades CCT program who had provided responses for the Behrman (2007) study of that program, and (6) a small group of �experts� on cash transfer programs. In some cases, the same informant was knowledgeable about more than one program; therefore we constructed informant-program data. A total of 627 key informant-program combinations were identified from which we obtained 497 (79.2 percent) valid email addresses. We received 369 (58.9 percent) original responses and we were able to conduct 220 (35.1 percent) interviews. The typical questions were structured as indicated below for a key informant who was involved with the CCT program in which IFPRI was involved in the evaluation.

Suggested Citation

  • Behrman, Jere R. & Calderon, Maria Cecilia, 2009. "Case study on IFPRI and conditional cash transfer (CCT) and non-conditional cash ransfer (NCCT) programs:," Impact assessments 30, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:impass:30
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ryan, James G. & Garrett, James L., 2003. "The impact of economic policy research," Impact assessments 20, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Islam, Yassir & Garrett, James L., 1997. "IFPRI and the abolition of the wheat flour ration shops in Pakistan: a case-study on policymaking and the use and impact of research," Impact assessments 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Park, Donghyun, 1998. "A proposal for measuring the benefits of policy-oriented social science research:," Impact assessments 3, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. David Zilberman & Amir Heiman, 1997. "The Value of Economic Research," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1539-1544.
    5. Anderson, Jock R. & Bos, Maria Soledad & Cohen, Marc J., 2005. "Impact assessment of food policy research a stocktaking workshop: synthesis report," Impact assessments 25, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. George W. Norton & Jeffrey Alwang, 1997. "Measuring the Benefits of Policy Research," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1534-1538.
    7. Babu, Suresh Chandra., 2000. "Impact of IFPRI's policy research on resource allocation and food security in Bangladesh," Impact assessments 13, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Kuyvenhoven, Arie, 2014. "Impact assessment of IFPRI’s capacity-strengthening work, 1985–2010," Impact assessments 38, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Paarlberg, Robert L., 2014. "Impact assessment: IFPRI 2020 conference on building resilience on food and nutrition security," Impact assessments 37, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Bennet, Jeffrey W., 2013. "An ex-post impact assessment of IFPRI's GRP22 program, water resource allocation: Productivity and environmental impacts:," Impact assessments 35, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Paarlberg, Robert L., 2012. "Impact Assessment: IFPRI 2020 conference "Leveraging Agriculture for Improving Nutrition and Health":," Impact assessments 34, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Norton, George W., 2011. "Impact assessment of the IFPRI agricultural science and technology indicators (ASTI) project:," Impact assessments 32, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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