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Does commodity money eliminate the indeterminacy of equilibria?

  • Ruilin Zhou

Previous studies have shown that a random-matching model with divisible at money and without constraint on agents' money inventories possesses a continuum of stationary single-price equilibria. Wallace [7] conjectured that the indeterminacy can be eliminated by the use of commodity money, just as the elimination of the contin- uum of dynamic (non-stationary) equilibria in models such asoverlapping generation or infnite-horizon money-in-utility-function. In contrast, I and that in a similar random-matching model with dividend-yielding commodity money, a continuum of stationary single-price equilibria exists when the utility ofdividend is not too high. This result casts doubt on the conventional belief that the indeterminacy of monetary equilibrium is caused only by the nominal nature of money.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in its series Working Paper Series with number WP-99-15.

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Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhwp:wp-99-15
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  1. Green, Edward J. & Zhou, Ruilin, 1998. "A Rudimentary Random-Matching Model with Divisible Money and Prices," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 252-271, August.
  2. Camera, Gabriele & Corbae, Dean, 1999. "Money and Price Dispersion," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(4), pages 985-1008, November.
  3. Edward J. Green & Ruilin Zhou, 2002. "Dynamic Monetary Equilibrium in a Random Matching Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 929-969, May.
  4. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth S., 1983. "Speculative Hyperinflations in Maximizing Models: Can We Rule Them Out?," Scholarly Articles 12491027, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  5. Arial Rubinstein & Asher Wolinsky, 1990. "Decentralized Trading, Strategic Behaviour and the Walrasian Outcome," Levine's Working Paper Archive 622, David K. Levine.
  6. Ruilin Zhou, 1996. "Individual and aggregate real balances in a random matching model," Staff Report 222, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  7. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1986. "Ruling out divergent speculative bubbles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 349-362, May.
  8. Roger B. Myerson & Mark A. Satterthwaite, 1981. "Efficient Mechanisms for Bilateral Trading," Discussion Papers 469S, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  9. Wallace, Neil, 1998. "Introduction to Modeling Money and Studying Monetary Policy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 223-231, August.
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