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Cross-sectional analysis of public infrastructure and regional productivity growth

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  • Randall W. Eberts

Abstract

An analysis of the relationship between local public capital stock and regional manufacturing output, inputs, and productivity between 1965 and 1977. Results show that the effect of public capital stock on regional productivity, although limited, cannot be dismissed, and that public infrastructure appears to be a major factor in explaining growth rates of inputs.

Suggested Citation

  • Randall W. Eberts, 1990. "Cross-sectional analysis of public infrastructure and regional productivity growth," Working Paper 9004, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcwp:9004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bartik, Timothy J, 1985. "Business Location Decisions in the United States: Estimates of the Effects of Unionization, Taxes, and Other Characteristics of States," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 3(1), pages 14-22, January.
    2. D. W. Jorgenson & Z. Griliches, 1967. "The Explanation of Productivity Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(3), pages 249-283.
    3. Aschauer, David Alan, 1989. "Is public expenditure productive?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 177-200, March.
    4. Alicia H. Munnell, 1990. "Why has productivity growth declined? Productivity and public investment," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 3-22.
    5. Randall W. Eberts, 1986. "Estimating the contribution of urban public infrastructure to regional growth," Working Paper 8610, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    6. Randall W. Eberts, 1990. "Public infrastructure and regional economic development," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q I, pages 15-27.
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    Cited by:

    1. Valter Di Giacinto & Giacinto Micucci & Pasqualino Montanaro, 2012. "Network effects of public transport infrastructure: Evidence on Italian regions," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 91(3), pages 515-541, August.
    2. Haughwout, Andrew F., 2002. "Public infrastructure investments, productivity and welfare in fixed geographic areas," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 405-428, March.
    3. Rosina Moreno Serrano & Manuel Artis Ortuno & Enrique Lopez Bazo & Jordi Surinach Caralt, 1997. "Evidence on the complex link between infrastructure and regional growth," Working Papers in Economics 19, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    4. Alfredo M. Pereira & Jorge M. Andraz, 2013. "On The Economic Effects Of Public Infrastructure Investment: A Survey Of The International Evidence," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 1-37, December.
    5. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, 1992. "Public-Sector Capital and the Productivity Puzzle," NBER Working Papers 4122, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jeffrey Thompson, 2010. "Prioritizing Approaches to Economic Development in New England: Skills, Infrastructure, and Tax Incentives," Published Studies priorities_september7_per, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    7. Jason Timmins, 2005. "Is Infrastructure Productive? Evaluating the effects of specific infrastructure projects on firm productivity within New Zealand," Working Papers 05_14, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    8. Haughwout, Andrew F., 1997. "Central city infrastructure investment and suburban house values," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 199-215, April.

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