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Integrating economics with the other human (and related) sciences: some initial considerations

  • David A. Spencer

    (University of Leeds)

Registered author(s):

    This paper addresses the scope and possibilities for integrating economics with other human and social sciences. It identifies and discusses two competing ways to achieve integration: a perspective based on the expansion of neoclassical economics and another approach that aims to build on the contribution of heterodox economics. The paper sees greater merit in the second of these two approaches and advocates the renewal of a broader political economy perspective in achieving an interdisciplinary economics. Other perspectives from within economic sociology are discussed and broader reflections are drawn on the obstacles and opportunities for pursuing interdisciplinary research in economics.

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    File URL: http://fessud.eu/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/FESSUD-Working-paper-series-01_04Mar_v4.pdf
    File Function: Full text
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    Paper provided by Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project in its series Working papers with number wpaper01.

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    Length: 50 pages
    Date of creation: 05 Apr 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:fes:wpaper:wpaper01
    Contact details of provider: Postal: FESSUD Co-ordinator (Malcolm Sawyer) Leeds University Business School Maurice Keyworth Buidling Leeds LS2 9JT

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    1. John B. Davis, 2008. "The turn in recent economics and return of orthodoxy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(3), pages 349-366, May.
    2. Donald MacKenzie, 2006. "An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262134608, June.
    3. Eckhard Hein, 2009. "A (Post-) Keynesian perspective on "financialisation"," IMK Studies 01-2009, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    4. Edward P. Lazear, 2000. "Economic Imperialism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(1), pages 99-146, February.
    5. Engelbert Stockhammer, 2000. "Financialization and the Slowdown of Accumulation," Working Papers geewp14, Vienna University of Economics and Business Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness.
    6. Tore Ellingsen & Magnus Johannesson, 2007. "Paying Respect," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(4), pages 135-150, Fall.
    7. Edward P. Lazear & Kathryn L. Shaw, 2007. "Personnel Economics: The Economist's View of Human Resources," NBER Working Papers 13653, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. George A. Akerlof, 2009. "How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1175-1175.
    9. Tony Lawson, 2009. "The current economic crisis: its nature and the course of academic economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(4), pages 759-777, July.
    10. Blaug, Mark, 2003. "The Formalist Revolution of the 1950s," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 145-156, June.
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