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The Direct Impact of Climate Change on Regional Labour Productivity

Author

Listed:
  • Tord Kjellstrom

    (Australian National University)

  • R. Sari Kovats

    (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)

  • Simon J. Lloyd

    (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)

  • Tom Holt

    (University of East Anglia)

  • Tol, Richard S. J.

    (Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI))

Abstract

Global climate change will increase outdoor and indoor heat loads, and may impair health and productivity for millions of working people. This study applies physiological evidence about effects of heat, climate guidelines for safe work environments, climate modelling and global distributions of working populations, to estimate the impact of two climate scenarios on future labour productivity. In most regions, climate change will decrease labour productivity, under the simple assumption of no specific adaptation. By the 2080s, the greatest absolute losses of population based labour work ability as compared with a situation of no heat impact (11-27%) are seen under the A2 scenario in South-East Asia, Andean and Central America, and the Caribbean. Climate change will significantly impact on labour productivity unless farmers, self-employed and employers invest in adaptive measures. Workers may need to work longer hours to achieve the same output and there will be economic costs of occupational health interventions against heat exposures.

Suggested Citation

  • Tord Kjellstrom & R. Sari Kovats & Simon J. Lloyd & Tom Holt & Tol, Richard S. J., 2008. "The Direct Impact of Climate Change on Regional Labour Productivity," Papers WP260, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp260
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    File URL: http://www.esri.ie/pubs/WP260.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bosello, Francesco & Roson, Roberto & Tol, Richard S.J., 2006. "Economy-wide estimates of the implications of climate change: Human health," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 579-591, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. -, 2011. "An assessment of the economic impact of climate change on the health sector In Trinidad And Tobago," Sede Subregional de la CEPAL para el Caribe (Estudios e Investigaciones) 38598, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; heat; work; labour productivity;

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