IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/esi/egpdis/2004-33.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The link between firm births and job creation: Is there a Upas Tree effect?

Author

Listed:
  • Adriaan J. van Stel

    ()

  • David J. Storey

    ()

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between firm births and job creation in Great Britain. We use a new data set for 60 British regions, covering the whole of Great Britain, between 1980 and 1998. The relationship between new-firm startups and employment growth has previously been examined either with no time-lag or with only a short period lag. We find, for GB as a whole, no significant relationship between startups and employment creation in the 1980s, but a negative relationship for the 'low enterprise' area of the North East of England. For the 1990s we find a significant positive relationship for GB as a whole but for Scotland, which focussed policy on startups, a negative relationship. We feel this raises questions over policies designed to raise rates of new firm formation as a strategy for employment creation, particularly in 'low enterprise' areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Adriaan J. van Stel & David J. Storey, 2004. "The link between firm births and job creation: Is there a Upas Tree effect?," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2004-33, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:esi:egpdis:2004-33
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: ftp://papers.econ.mpg.de/egp/discussionpapers/2004-33.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Cressy, Robert, 1996. "Are Business Startups Debt-Rationed?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1253-1270, September.
    3. Audretsch, D.B. & Fritsch, M., 1993. "A Note on the Measurement of Entry Rates," Papers 93-5, Bergakademie Freiberg Technical University - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    4. Francis J. Greene & Kevin F. Mole & David J. Storey, 2004. "Does More Mean Worse? Three Decades of Enterprise Policy in the Tees Valley," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 41(7), pages 1207-1228, June.
    5. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1982. "Selection and the Evolution of Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 649-670, May.
    6. David Audretsch & Michael Fritsch, 2002. "Growth Regimes over Time and Space," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 113-124.
    7. Anne E. Green & Ivan Turok, 2000. "Employability, Adaptability and Flexibility: Changing Labour Market Prospects," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(7), pages 599-600, October.
    8. Murray Z. Frank, 1988. "An Intertemporal Model of Industrial Exit," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(2), pages 333-344.
    9. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    10. Rees, Hedley & Shah, Anup, 1986. "An Empirical Analysis of Self-employment in the U.K," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(1), pages 95-108, January.
    11. C. M. Van Praag & J. S. Cramer, 2001. "The Roots of Entrepreneurship and Labour Demand: Individual Ability and Low Risk Aversion," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(269), pages 45-62, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. van Stel, Andre & Storey, David, 2002. "Entrepreneurial growth in British regions 1980-1998," ERSA conference papers ersa02p243, European Regional Science Association.
    2. André van Stel & David Storey, 2002. "The Relationship between Firm Births and Job Creation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-052/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. André Stel & Kashifa Suddle, 2008. "The impact of new firm formation on regional development in the Netherlands," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 31-47, January.
    4. Calá, Carla Daniela, 2014. "Regional issues on firm entry and exit in argentina: core and peripheral regions," Nülan. Deposited Documents 2023, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales, Centro de Documentación.
    5. Flores-Romero, Manuel G, 2004. "Survival Of The Small Firm And The Entrepreneur Under Demand And Efficiency Uncertainty," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 700, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    6. Flores-Romero, Manuel G., 2004. "Survival of the Small Firm and the Entrepreneur under Demand and Effciency Uncertainty," Economic Research Papers 269594, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    7. Marc Cowling & Mark Taylor & Peter Mitchell, 2004. "Job Creators," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 72(5), pages 601-617, September.
    8. Enrico Santarelli & Marco Vivarelli, 2007. "Entrepreneurship and the process of firms’ entry, survival and growth," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 455-488, June.
    9. Rui Baptista & Vítor Escária & Paulo Madruga, 2008. "Entrepreneurship, regional development and job creation: the case of Portugal," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 49-58, January.
    10. Sven-Olov Daunfeldt & Niklas Elert & Dan Johansson, 2014. "The Economic Contribution of High-Growth Firms: Do Policy Implications Depend on the Choice of Growth Indicator?," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 337-365, September.
    11. Sven-Olov Daunfeldt & Niklas Elert & Dan Johansson, 2016. "Are high-growth firms overrepresented in high-tech industries?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 1-21.
    12. David B. Audretsch & Max Keilbach, 2006. "Entrepreneurship, Growth and Restructuring," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2006-13, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
    13. Fairlie, Robert W. & Holleran, William, 2012. "Entrepreneurship training, risk aversion and other personality traits: Evidence from a random experiment," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 366-378.
    14. Rui Baptista & Miguel Preto, 2011. "New firm formation and employment growth: regional and business dynamics," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 419-442, May.
    15. Rocha, Vera & Carneiro, Anabela & Amorim Varum, Celeste, 2015. "Serial entrepreneurship, learning by doing and self-selection," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 91-106.
    16. Nobuyuki Harada, 2007. "Which Firms Exit and Why? An Analysis of Small Firm Exits in Japan," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 401-414, December.
    17. Metzger, Georg, 2007. "Personal experience: a most vicious and limited circle!? On the role of entrepreneurial experience for firm survival," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-046, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    18. Vera Catarina Rocha, 2012. "The entrepreneur in economic theory: from an invisible man toward a new research field," FEP Working Papers 459, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    19. Susanne Prantl, 2000. "Post-Entry Selection Among Newly Founded Firms in East and West Germany after Unification: A Competing Risk Model with Forced Bankruptcy Liquidations and Voluntary Liquidations," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1602, Econometric Society.
    20. Tarlok Singh, 2010. "Does International Trade Cause Economic Growth? A Survey," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(11), pages 1517-1564, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:esi:egpdis:2004-33. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kerstin Schück) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Kerstin Schück to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/mpiewde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.