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The Liquidity Effect in Algeria and Morocco: A Multivariate Threshold Autoregressive Investigation


  • Mohamed Benbouziane

    () (Faculty of economics and management, Tlemcen University)

  • Abdelhak Benamar
  • Mustapha Djennas


The objective of this paper is to test for the liquidity effect in Algeria and Morocco using multivariate threshold autoregressive model (MVTAR) as proposed by Tsay (1998). Our empirical results have several important implications. First, results do not support threshold behavior in the case of Algeria. Moreover, when using M1 as a proxy of monetary policy, the liquidity effect hypothesis is rejected in this country. When using bank deposit assets (BDA), results show that there is a negative relationship between monetary shocks and interest rate, and accordingly accepting the liquidity effect. Secondly, in the case of Morocco, however, results show an asymmetric response of interest rate to positive and negative shocks of monetary policy. Moreover, these results strongly support a threshold behavior when BDA is employed, while weakly supporting the same behavior using M1. Furthermore, and using the proxy of bank deposit assets, the liquidity effect are accepted in the low inflation regime, whereas it is rejected in the high inflation regime. Hence, the threshold behavior offers an interesting alternative for explaining the relationship between interest rates and monetary policy shocks. The results presented herein may give more insights on the transmission mechanism of monetary policy in different inflationary environments. Accordingly, a good inflation targeting policy would yield better results in this context. Indeed, the liquidity effect breaks down for the high inflation regime, as inflationary expectations are immediately responsive to money growth. In a low-inflation regime, however, money is not considered to be neutral, as it could affect output through the liquidity effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohamed Benbouziane & Abdelhak Benamar & Mustapha Djennas, 2010. "The Liquidity Effect in Algeria and Morocco: A Multivariate Threshold Autoregressive Investigation," Working Papers 525, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 Jan 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:525

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