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Contracting for wind generation

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  • David Newbery

    () (Electricity Policy Research Group, University of Cambridge)

Abstract

The UK Government proposes offering long-term Feed-in-Tariffs (FiTs) to low-carbon generation to reduce risk and encourage new entrants. Their preference is for a Contract-for-Difference (CfD) or a premium FiT (pFiT) for all generation regardless of type. I argue that neither is suitable for on-shore wind, where a fixed FiT appears less risky. The estimated extra trading and balancing costs of a CfD for on-shore wind might be £70 million/yr by 2020, while the cost of the increased risk incurred by a pFiT might add another £180 m/yr. If similar savings were made to projected off-shore wind investments the savings might be three times as high.
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Suggested Citation

  • David Newbery, 2011. "Contracting for wind generation," Working Papers EPRG 1120, Energy Policy Research Group, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:enp:wpaper:eprg1120
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Green, Richard & Vasilakos, Nicholas, 2010. "Market behaviour with large amounts of intermittent generation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3211-3220, July.
    2. Frieder Borggrefe & Karsten Neuhoff, 2011. "Balancing and Intraday Market Design: Options for Wind Integration," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1162, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pollitt, M. & Dale, L., 2018. "Restructuring the Chinese Electricity Supply Sector - How industrial electricity prices are determined in a liberalized power market: lessons from Great Britain," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1871, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Zapata, Sebastian & Castaneda, Monica & Franco, Carlos Jaime & Dyner, Isaac, 2019. "Clean and secure power supply: A system dynamics based appraisal," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 9-21.
    3. Toke, David, 2011. "UK Electricity Market Reform—revolution or much ado about nothing?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 7609-7611.
    4. van Kooten, G. Cornelis, 2015. "All you want to know about the Economics of Wind Power," Working Papers 241693, University of Victoria, Resource Economics and Policy.
    5. Claire M. Weiller & Michael G. Pollitt, 2013. "Platform Markets and Energy Services," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1361, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    6. Newbery, David, 2016. "Missing money and missing markets: Reliability, capacity auctions and interconnectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 401-410.
    7. David M. Newbery, 2012. "Reforming Competitive Electricity Markets to Meet Environmental Targets," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).
    8. Richter, Laura-Lucia & Pollitt, Michael G., 2018. "Which smart electricity service contracts will consumers accept? The demand for compensation in a platform market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 436-450.
    9. Higgins, P. & Foley, A.M. & Douglas, R. & Li, K., 2014. "Impact of offshore wind power forecast error in a carbon constraint electricity market," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 187-197.
    10. Newbery, David M., 2016. "Towards a green energy economy? The EU Energy Union’s transition to a low-carbon zero subsidy electricity system – Lessons from the UK’s Electricity Market Reform," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 179(C), pages 1321-1330.
    11. Balta-Ozkan, Nazmiye & Yildirim, Julide & Connor, Peter M., 2015. "Regional distribution of photovoltaic deployment in the UK and its determinants: A spatial econometric approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 417-429.
    12. Finn Roar Aune & Rolf Golombek, 2020. "Are carbon prices redundant in the 2030 EU climate and energy policy package?," Discussion Papers 940, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    wind power; long-term contracts; balancing costs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities

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