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The formation and take-off of the Sao Paulo automobile-industry cluster

Author

Listed:
  • Tomàs Fernández-de-Sevilla

    () (Free University of Brussels)

  • Armando J Dalla Costa

    (Federal University of Paraná)

Abstract

"The bulk of the automotive-industry in Brazil, country which is ranked in the top-ten of world cars producer since the mid-1960s, has been concentrated around the city of São Paulo. We aim to explain the formation and growth of the São Paulo auto-industry cluster. In doing so, four explanations are used: the presence of external economies (Marshall, 1890; Porter, 1990); the capabilities of large companies, which act as regional hubs (Chandler, 1990; Markusen, 1996; Lazonick, 2010); the adoption of active industrial policies (Amsden, 1989, 2001; Chang, 2002); and the institutional environment (Bagnasco, 1977; Brusco, 1982; Becattini, 1990; Porter, 1998)."

Suggested Citation

  • Tomàs Fernández-de-Sevilla & Armando J Dalla Costa, 2017. "The formation and take-off of the Sao Paulo automobile-industry cluster," Working Papers 17014, Economic History Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehs:wpaper:17014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael E. Porter, 2000. "Location, Competition, and Economic Development: Local Clusters in a Global Economy," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 14(1), pages 15-34, February.
    2. Shapiro, Helen, 1991. "Determinants of Firm Entry into the Brazilian Automobile Manufacturing Industry, 1956–1968," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(04), pages 876-947, December.
    3. List, Friedrich, 1885. "The National System of Political Economy," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number list1885.
    4. Allen, Robert C., 2011. "Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199596652.
    5. William Lazonick, 2010. "The Chandlerian corporation and the theory of innovative enterprise," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 317-349, April.
    6. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 1997. "Technological Regimes and Sectoral Patterns of Innovative Activities," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 83-117.
    7. Wagner, Alfred, 1891. "Marshall's Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 5, pages 319-338.
    8. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(02), pages 385-406, June.
    9. Jenkins, Rhys, 1995. "The Political Economy of Industrial Policy: Automobile Manufacture in the Newly Industrialising Countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(5), pages 625-645, October.
    10. Steven Klepper, 2002. "The capabilities of new firms and the evolution of the US automobile industry," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(4), pages 645-666, August.
    11. Brusco, Sebastiano, 1982. "The Emilian Model: Productive Decentralisation and Social Integration," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(2), pages 167-184, June.
    12. Chang, Ha-Joon, 1993. "The Political Economy of Industrial Policy in Korea," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 131-157, June.
    13. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 562-583, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial Districts and Clusters; Automotive Industry; External Economies; Large Companies; Active Industrial Policy; Institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • N66 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N96 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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