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Non-residential fatherhood and child involvement: evidence from the millennium cohort study

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  • Kiernan, Kathleen

Abstract

Fifteen per cent of British babies are now born to parents who are neither cohabiting nor married. Little is known about non-residential fatherhood that commences with the birth of a child. Here, we use the Millennium Cohort Study to examine a number of aspects of this form of fatherhood. Firstly, we consider the extent to which these fathers were involved with or acknowledged their child at the time of the birth. Secondly, we identify the characteristics that differentiate parents who continue to live apart from those who move in together. Thirdly, for the fathers who moved in with the mother and their child we enquire whether they differ in the extent of their engagement in family life compared with fathers who have been living with the mother since birth. Finally, for fathers who were living apart from their child when the child was 9 months old we assess the extent to which they were in contact, contributed to their maintenance and were involved in their child’s life at this time.

Suggested Citation

  • Kiernan, Kathleen, 2005. "Non-residential fatherhood and child involvement: evidence from the millennium cohort study," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6257, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:6257
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/6257/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Suzanne Bianchi, 1998. "Introduction to the Special Issue: “Men in Families”," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(2), pages 133-133, May.
    2. Gunnar Andersson, 2002. "Children's experience of family disruption and family formation: Evidence from 16 FFS countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(7), pages 343-364, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    non-resident fathers; ethnic families; fatherhood; father involvement; unmarried mothers; non-marital births; cohabiting parents;

    JEL classification:

    • K19 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Other
    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General

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