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Agglomeration vs. Organizational Reproduction: The Molds Cluster in Portugal

  • Carla Costa
  • Rui Baptista

    ()

The mechanisms driving regional clustering are examined by exploring two theories: agglomeration economies and organizational reproduction. While organizational reproduction through spinoffs dominates clusters' early stages of growth, in clusters populated by small, vertically disintegrated firms accessing networks of external capabilities, agglomeration economies should emerge as a positive force. We examine just such a cluster: the molds industry in Portugal. Our empirical approach is twofold: first, we examine the early evolution (1946–1986) of the industry; second, we use detailed data on firms and founders for the period 1987–2009 to test the predictions of the two theories. We find that while organizational reproduction has played a major role in clustering, agglomeration economies recently have gained influence.

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File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1222.pdf
File Function: Version November 2012
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Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 1222.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2012
Date of revision: Nov 2012
Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1222
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  1. Ellison, Glenn & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 889-927, October.
  2. Brusco, Sebastiano, 1982. "The Emilian Model: Productive Decentralisation and Social Integration," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(2), pages 167-84, June.
  3. Guido Buenstorf & Dirk Fornahl, 2009. "B2C—bubble to cluster: the dot-com boom, spin-off entrepreneurship, and regional agglomeration," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 19(3), pages 349-378, June.
  4. Guido Buenstorf & Steven Klepper, 2005. "Heritage and Agglomeration: The Akron Tire Cluster Revisited," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2005-08, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  5. Baptista, Rui & Swann, Peter, 1998. "Do firms in clusters innovate more?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 525-540, September.
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