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Die Bedeutung von Herkunftsfamilie, Berufsbiografie und Partnerschaften für den Übergang zur Ehe und Vaterschaft

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  • Angelika Tölke

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which a difficult entry into the labor market and insecurities during the working life affect men’s decision to marry and to have their first child and how these effects hold true when characteristics of the family of origin and the respondents own relationship history are included. Data of the third “Familiensurvey” of the German Youth Institute, conducted in the year 2000, are analyzed for men in Western Germany. Under difficult and/or insecure circumstances men delay their start of a family. Being not employed, being self-employed or working part-time is in particular decisive. The composition of the family of origin still have an impact when men are grown up and when they decide about starting a family. Having siblings increases the propensity to marry and to start one’s own family in particular whereas the loss of a parent by death decreases the probability.

Suggested Citation

  • Angelika Tölke, 2004. "Die Bedeutung von Herkunftsfamilie, Berufsbiografie und Partnerschaften für den Übergang zur Ehe und Vaterschaft," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-007, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2004-007
    DOI: 10.4054/MPIDR-WP-2004-007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Germany (Alte Bundesländer); cohabitation; employment; marriage; parenthood; parents;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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