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Demand-Driven Innovation and Spatial Competition Over Time

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  • Jovanovic, Boyan
  • Rob, Rafael

Abstract

This paper explores a model of innovation and spatial competition over time. A key implication of the paper is that firms' size is positively autocorrelated across time. The mechanism that generates this persistence works only in heterogenous-product markets and is based on the idea that larger firms possess better information about the design of future products. Some corroborating evidence is cited.
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Suggested Citation

  • Jovanovic, Boyan & Rob, Rafael, 1985. "Demand-Driven Innovation and Spatial Competition Over Time," Working Papers 85-34, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cvs:starer:85-34
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    Cited by:

    1. Das, Sanghamitra, 1995. "Size, age and firm growth in an infant industry: The computer hardware industry in India," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 111-126, March.
    2. Chen, Ming-Yuan, 2002. "Survival duration of plants: Evidence from the US petroleum refining industry," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 517-555, April.
    3. Bing Jing & Roy Radner, 2004. "Nonconvex Production Technology and Price Discrimination," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 513, Econometric Society.
    4. Giorgio Fagiolo & Mauro Napoletano & Andrea Roventini, 2008. "Are output growth-rate distributions fat-tailed? some evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(5), pages 639-669.
    5. Massimiliano Bratti & Giulia Felice, 2012. "Are Exporters More Likely to Introduce Product Innovations?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(11), pages 1559-1598, November.
    6. Ibragimov, Rustam, 2008. "A Tale of Two Tails: Peakedness Properties in Inheritance Models of Evolutionary Theory," Scholarly Articles 2624003, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    7. Renáta Kosová & Francine Lafontaine, 2010. "SURVIVAL AND GROWTH IN RETAIL AND SERVICE INDUSTRIES: EVIDENCE FROM FRANCHISED CHAINS -super-," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 542-578, September.
    8. Roland Strausz, 2017. "A Theory of Crowdfunding: A Mechanism Design Approach with Demand Uncertainty and Moral Hazard," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(6), pages 1430-1476, June.
    9. Ibragimov, Rustam, 2014. "On the robustness of location estimators in models of firm growth under heavy-tailedness," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 181(1), pages 25-33.
    10. Rustam Ibragimov, 2004. "Shifting paradigms: on the robustness of economic models to heavy-tailedness assumptions," Econometric Society 2004 Latin American Meetings 105, Econometric Society.
    11. Rustam Ibragimov, 2008. "A tale of two tails: peakedness properties in inheritance models of evolutionary theory," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 18(5), pages 597-613, October.
    12. Dominique Olié Lauga & Elie Ofek, 2009. "Market Research and Innovation Strategy in a Duopoly," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 28(2), pages 373-396, 03-04.
    13. David Greenstreet, 2007. "Exploiting Sequential Learning to Estimate Establishment-Level Productivity Dynamics and Decision Rules," Economics Series Working Papers 345, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    14. Rustam Ibragimov, 2005. "Portfolio Diversification and Value At Risk Under Thick-Tailedness," Yale School of Management Working Papers amz2386, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Aug 2005.

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