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The Relative Price of Non-traded Goods in an Imperfectly Competitive Economy: Empirical Evidence for G7 Countries

  • Coto-Martinez, J.
  • Reboredo, J. C.
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    In this paper, we consider the role of imperfect competition in explaining the relative price of non-traded to traded goods within the Balassa-Samuelson framework. Under imperfect competition in the two sectors, relative prices depend on both productivity differentials and mark-up differentials. We test this implication using a panel of sectors for the seven major OECD countries. The empirical evidence suggests that relative price movements are well explained by productivity and mark-up differentials. Unlike the original Balassa-Samuelson model, aggregate demand could affect the real exchange rate by changing the mark ups. The empirical results show that aggregate demand fluctuations lead to changes on the mark-ups.

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    File URL: http://city.eprints.org/1475/1/0714_coto-martinez_reboredo.pdf
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    Paper provided by Department of Economics, City University London in its series Working Papers with number 07/14.

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    Date of creation: 2007
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    Handle: RePEc:cty:dpaper:07/14
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Social Sciences Building, City University London, Whiskin Street, London, EC1R 0JD, United Kingdom,
    Phone: +44 (0)20 7040 8500
    Web page: http://www.city.ac.uk

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    1. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe, 1995. "Comparing four models of aggregate fluctuations due to self-fulfilling expectations," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 95-17, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Robert E. Hall, 1986. "The Relation Between Price and Marginal Cost in U.S. Industry," NBER Working Papers 1785, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Michael Reutter & Hans-Werner Sinn, 2000. "The Minimum Inflation Rate for Euroland," CESifo Working Paper Series 377, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Froot, Kenneth A. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Perspectives on PPP and long-run real exchange rates," Handbook of International Economics, in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 32, pages 1647-1688 Elsevier.
    5. Sergio Rebelo & Carlos A. Vegh, 1995. "Real Effects of Exchange Rate-Based Stabilization: An Analysis of Competing Theories," NBER Working Papers 5197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Bela Balassa, 1964. "The Purchasing-Power Parity Doctrine: A Reappraisal," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72, pages 584.
    7. Caroline M. Betts & Timothy J. Kehoe, 2008. "Real Exchange Rate Movements and the Relative Price of Non-traded Goods," NBER Working Papers 14437, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Menzie David Chinn, 1997. "Sectoral Productivity, Government Spending and Real Exchange Rates: Empirical Evidence for OECD Countries," NBER Working Papers 6017, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Caroline M. Betts & Timothy J. Kehoe, 2005. "U.S. Real Exchange Rate Fluctuations and Relative Price Fluctuations," IEPR Working Papers 05.16, Institute of Economic Policy Research (IEPR).
    10. Bergstrand, Jeffrey H, 1991. "Structural Determinants of Real Exchange Rates and National Price Levels: Some Empirical Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 325-34, March.
    11. DeLoach, Stephen B, 2001. "More Evidence in Favor of the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 336-42, May.
    12. Asea, Patrick K & Mendoza, Enrique G, 1994. "The Balassa-Samuelson Model: A General-Equilibrium Appraisal," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(3), pages 244-67, October.
    13. Michael B. Devereux, 1997. "Real Exchange Rates and Macroeconomics: Evidence and Theory," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 773-808, November.
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