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Managerial capacity in the innovation process and firm profitability

This paper studies at firm level the relation between managerial capacity in doing innovation and profitability. Moving along the intersection between the evolutionary/neo-Schumpeterian theory and the Resource-Based-View of the firm, we prove econometrically that managerial efficiency in mastering the production of innovation is an important determinant of firm innovative performance and market success, and that it complements traditional Schumpeterian drivers. By using a Stochastic Frontier Analysis, we provide a “direct” measure of innovation managerial capacity, then plugged into a profit margin equation augmented by the traditional Schumpeterian drivers of profitability (size, demand, market size and concentration, technological opportunities, etc.) and other control-variables. We run both a OLS and a series of Quantile Regressions to better stress the role played by companies’ heterogeneous response of profitability to innovative managerial capacity at different points of the distribution of the operating profit margin.Results find evidence of an average positive effect of the innovation managerial capacity on firm profitability, although quantile regressions show that this “mean effect” is mainly driven by a stronger magnitude of the effect for lower quantiles (i.e., for firms having negative or low positive profitability). It means that lower profitable firms might gain more from an increase of managerial efficiency in doing innovation than more profitable businesses.

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File URL: http://www.ceris.cnr.it/ceris/workingpaper/2013/WP_1_cerulli_poti.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for Economic Research on Firms and Growth - Moncalieri (TO) in its series CERIS Working Paper with number 201301.

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Length: 19 pages Keywords : Innovation; Firm profitability; Managerial capacity; Firm capabilities; Evolutionary/Neo-Schumpeterian theory; Stochastic frontier analysis; Quantile regression
Date of creation: Jun 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:csc:cerisp:201301
Contact details of provider: Postal: Via Real Collegio, 30 10024 - Moncalieri TO
Phone: +39-11.6824.911
Fax: +39-11.6824.966
Web page: http://www.ceris.cnr.it/
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  1. Dosi, G. & Marengo, L. & Pasquali, C., 2006. "How much should society fuel the greed of innovators?: On the relations between appropriability, opportunities and rates of innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1110-1121, October.
  2. Jacques Mairesse & Pierre Mohnen, 2002. "Accounting for Innovation and Measuring Innovativeness: An Illustrative Framework and an Application," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 226-230, May.
  3. Crepon, B. & Duguet, E. & Mairesse, J., 1998. "Research Investment, Innovation and Productivity: An Econometric Analysis at the Firm Level," Papiers d'Economie Mathématique et Applications 98.15, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  4. Jennifer Percival & Brian Cozzarin, 2008. "Complementarities Affecting the Returns to Innovation," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 371-392.
  5. Teece, David J., 1993. "Profiting from technological innovation: Implications for integration, collaboration, licensing and public policy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 112-113, April.
  6. Gantumur, Tseveen & Stephan, Andreas, 2010. "Do External Technology Acquisitions Matter For Innovative Efficiency and Productivity?," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 222, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  7. Bughin, J. & Jacques, J. M., 1994. "Managerial efficiency and the Schumpeterian link between size, market structure and innovation revisited," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 653-659, November.
  8. Elena Cefis & Matteo Ciccarelli, 2005. "Profit differentials and innovation," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1-2), pages 43-61.
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