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Differential Mortality and Retirement Benefits in the Health and Retirement Study

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  • Barry P. Bosworth
  • Kathleen Burke

Abstract

This analysis uses data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to examine the sources of variation in mortality for individuals of varying socioeconomic status. The use of the HRS allows a distinction between education and a measure of career earnings as primary determinants of socioeconomic status for men and women separately. We use those predictions of mortality to estimate the distribution of annual and lifetime Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance benefits for different birth cohorts spanning the birth years from 1900 to 1950. We find differential rates of mortality have had substantial effects in altering the distribution of lifetime benefits in favor of higher income individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Barry P. Bosworth & Kathleen Burke, 2014. "Differential Mortality and Retirement Benefits in the Health and Retirement Study," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2014-4, Center for Retirement Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:crr:crrwps:wp2014-4
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    Cited by:

    1. Janet Currie & Hannes Schwandt, 2016. "Mortality Inequality: The Good News from a County-Level Approach," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 29-52, Spring.
    2. repec:pal:gpprii:v:42:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1057_s41288-017-0057-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Teresa Ghilarducci & Bridget Fisher & Kyle Moore, 2015. "The Hispanic Health Paradox," SCEPA policy note series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2015-03, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    4. Matthew Weinzierl, 2014. "Seesaws and Social Security Benefits Indexing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 45(2 (Fall)), pages 137-196.
    5. repec:mes:challe:v:58:y:2015:i:3:p:197-221 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Andrew J.G. Cairns & Malene Kallestrup-Lamb & Carsten P.T. Rosenskjold & David Blake & Kevin Dowd, 2016. "Modelling Socio-Economic Differences in the Mortality of Danish Males Using a New Affluence Index," CREATES Research Papers 2016-14, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    7. Courtney Coile & Kevin Milligan & David A. Wise, 2016. "Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages, pages 359-394 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Bridget Fisher, 2015. "The Myth of Self-Financing: The Trade-Offs Behind the Hudson Yards Redevelopment Project," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2015-04, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    9. Bartik, Timothy J. & Hershbein, Brad & Lachowska, Marta, 2016. "The Merits of Universal Scholarships: Benefit-Cost Evidence from the Kalamazoo Promise," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 400-433, September.
    10. Michael Baker & Janet Currie & Hannes Schwandt, 2017. "Mortality Inequality in Canada and the U.S.: Divergent or Convergent Trends?," NBER Working Papers 23514, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Kevin Milligan & Tammy Schirle, 2016. "Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from Canada," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages, pages 59-83 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Jon D. Wisman & Aaron Pacitti, 2014. "What the Rich Won Over the Past 35 Years and What Everyone Else Lost," Working Papers 2014-08, American University, Department of Economics.
    13. Teresa Ghilarducci & Kyle Moore, 2015. "Racially Disparate Effects of Raising the Retirement Age," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2015-03, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    14. Matthew Weinzierl, 2014. "Seesaws and Social Security Benefits Indexing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 49(2 (Fall)), pages 137-196.
    15. Alan J. Auerbach & Kerwin K. Charles & Courtney C. Coile & William Gale & Dana Goldman & Ronald Lee & Charles M. Lucas & Peter R. Orszag & Louise M. Sheiner & Bryan Tysinger & David N. Weil & Justin W, 2017. "How the Growing Gap in Life Expectancy May Affect Retirement Benefits and Reforms," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 42(3), pages 475-499, July.
    16. Courtney Coile & Kevin S. Milligan & David A. Wise, 2016. "Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from the U.S," NBER Working Papers 21940, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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