IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cpr/ceprdp/3638.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Market Access and Tax Competition

Author

Listed:
  • Ottaviano, Gianmarco
  • van Ypersele, Tanguy

Abstract

In this Paper, we show that with international externalities, different country sizes, imperfect competition and trade costs, tax competition for mobile firms is efficiency enhancing with respect to the free market outcome. Nonetheless, while the latter entails too many firms in the larger country, the former has too many firms in the smaller one. Under both scenarios the resulting inefficiencies in international specialization and trade flows vanish when trade costs are low enough. Otherwise, only international tax coordination can implement the efficient spatial distribution of firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Ottaviano, Gianmarco & van Ypersele, Tanguy, 2002. "Market Access and Tax Competition," CEPR Discussion Papers 3638, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3638
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=3638
    Download Restriction: CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gianmarco Ottaviano, 2003. "Regional Policy in the Global Economy: Insights from New Economic Geography," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(6-7), pages 665-673.
    2. Signe Krogstrup, 2002. "What do Theories of Tax Competition Predict for Capital Taxes in EU Countries? A Review of the Tax Competition Literature," IHEID Working Papers 05-2002, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    3. Richard E. Baldwin & Toshihiro Okubo, 2014. "Tax Competition with Heterogeneous Firms," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 309-326, September.
    4. Gaigné, Carl & Wooton, Ian, 2011. "The gains from preferential tax regimes reconsidered," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 59-66, January.
    5. Signe Krogstrup, 2008. "Standard Tax Competition and Increasing Returns," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 10(4), pages 547-561, August.
    6. Matthias Wrede, 2014. "Agglomeration, tax competition, and fiscal equalization," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 21(6), pages 1012-1027, December.
    7. Signe Krogstrup, 2004. "Increasing Returns in a Standard Tax Competition Model," IHEID Working Papers 02-2004, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    8. Candau Fabien, 2005. "Lumpy World and Race to the Bottom," International Trade 0508008, EconWPA, revised 20 Feb 2006.
    9. Souleymane COULIBALY, 2008. "Empirical Assessment of the Existence of Taxable Agglomeration Rents," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 08.01, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    10. Richard Nahuis & Paul Tang, 2005. "Environmental policy competition and differential tax treatment; a case for tighter coordination?," CPB Discussion Paper 50, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    11. Carl Gaigné & Stéphane Riou, 2007. "Globalization, Asymmetric Tax Competition, and Fiscal Equalization," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 9(5), pages 901-925, October.
    12. Facundo Albornoz and Gregory Corcos, 2005. "Subsidy Competition in Integrating Economies," Discussion Papers 05-14, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    13. Nelly Exbrayat & Benny Geys, 2011. "Trade Integration and Business Tax Differentials: Theory and Evidence from OECD Countries," Post-Print halshs-00617043, HAL.
    14. Nelly Exbrayat, 2013. "Corporate tax differentials in a multi-country world with imperfectly integrated economies," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1374-1382.
    15. Facundo Albornoz & Grégory Corcos, 2005. "Subsidy competition in integrating economies," Working Papers halshs-00590785, HAL.
    16. Exbrayat, Nelly & Geys, Benny, 2012. "Trade integration and business tax differentials: Evidence from OECD countries," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship & Project "The Future of Fiscal Federalism" SP II 2012-110, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    17. Nelly Exbrayat, 2008. "The Impact of Trade Integration and Agglomeration Economies on Tax Interactions : Evidence from OECD Countries," Post-Print hal-00270067, HAL.
    18. Candau, Fabien, 2006. "The Spatial and Public Economics of Regions, a Theoretical and Empirical Survey," MPRA Paper 1153, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital mobility; monopolistic competition; tax competition; trade;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3638. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.