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The Adoption of Labour Standards Conventions: Who, When and Why?

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  • Chau, Nancy H
  • Kanbur, Ravi

Abstract

The ratification of ILO Labour Standards Conventions is a key explanatory variable in the empirical literature linking labour standards to economic performance. The assumption is that ratification gives information about labour standards implemented in a country. This Paper investigates the determinants of ratification directly and, indirectly, the determinants of labour standards. We find considerable variation across different Conventions, and across developing and developed countries. But there are some systematic and interesting patterns. While economic variables such as per capita income do not explain ratification, legal systems do. Most interestingly, for some Conventions, even after controlling for basic economic characteristics and domestic legal institutions, we find that peer effects are in play and the probability of adopting an international standard depends on how many other countries in a peer group have already adopted that standard.

Suggested Citation

  • Chau, Nancy H & Kanbur, Ravi, 2001. "The Adoption of Labour Standards Conventions: Who, When and Why?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2904, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2904
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    Cited by:

    1. Rémi Bazillier & Nicolas Sirven, 2006. "Les normes fondamentales du travail contribuent-elles à réduire les inégalités ?," Revue Française d'Économie, Programme National Persée, vol. 21(2), pages 111-146.
    2. Jean-Marc Siroën, 2012. "Core labour standards and exports," Working Papers DT/2012/18, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10660 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Valckx, Nico, 2004. "WTO financial services commitments: Determinants and impact on financial stability," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 517-541.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour standards; legal systems; peer effects; ratification of ILO conventions;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J58 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Public Policy

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