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Do the Rich Get Richer in the Stock Market? Evidence from India

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  • Campbell, John Y
  • Ramadorai, Tarun
  • Ranish, Benjamin

Abstract

We use data on Indian stock portfolios to show that return heterogeneity is the primary contributor to increasing inequality of wealth held in risky assets by Indian individual investors. Return heterogeneity increases equity wealth inequality through two main channels, both of which are related to the prevalence of undiversified accounts that own relatively few stocks. First, some undiversified portfolios randomly do well, while others randomly do poorly. Second, larger accounts diversify more effectively and thereby earn higher average log returns even though their average simple returns are no higher than those of smaller accounts.

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  • Campbell, John Y & Ramadorai, Tarun & Ranish, Benjamin, 2018. "Do the Rich Get Richer in the Stock Market? Evidence from India," CEPR Discussion Papers 13116, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13116
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    Cited by:

    1. Mitchell, Olivia S. & Utkus, Stephen P., 2022. "Target-date funds and portfolio choice in 401(k) plans," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(4), pages 519-536, October.
    2. Andreas Fagereng & Luigi Guiso & Davide Malacrino & Luigi Pistaferri, 2020. "Heterogeneity and Persistence in Returns to Wealth," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 88(1), pages 115-170, January.
    3. John Y. Campbell & Tarun Ramadorai & Benjamin Ranish, 2019. "Do the Rich Get Richer in the Stock Market? Evidence from India," American Economic Review: Insights, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 225-240, September.
    4. Anagol, Santosh & Balasubramaniam, Vimal & Ramadorai, Tarun, 2021. "Learning from noise: Evidence from India’s IPO lotteries," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(3), pages 965-986.
    5. Francisco Gomes & Michael Haliassos & Tarun Ramadorai, 2021. "Household Finance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 59(3), pages 919-1000, September.
    6. Frost, Jon & Gambacorta, Leonardo & Gambacorta, Romina, 2020. "The Matthew effect and modern finance: on the nexus between wealth inequality, financial development and financial technology," CEPR Discussion Papers 15014, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Morone, Andrea & Caferra, Rocco, 2020. "Inequalities in financial markets: Evidences from a laboratory experiment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 88(C).
    8. An, Li & Lou, Dong & Shi, Donghui, 2022. "Wealth redistribution in bubbles and crashes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 134-153.
    9. Ram Singh, 2022. "Do the Wealthy Underreport their Income? Analysing Relationship between Wealth and Reported Income in India," Working papers 331, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
    10. Lou, Dong, 2020. "Wealth Redistribution in Bubbles and Crashes," CEPR Discussion Papers 15029, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Lukas Menkhoff & Carsten Schröder, 2022. "Risky Asset Holdings During Covid‐19 and their Distributional Impact: Evidence from Germany," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 68(2), pages 497-517, June.
    12. Yang, Yunfan & Wu, Yueyue, 2021. "The Impact of Financial Literacy on China Rural Household Assets - Based on the Gender Differences," 2021 Conference, August 17-31, 2021, Virtual 315392, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    13. Fisher, Jack & Gavazza, Alessandro & Liu, Lu & Ramadorai, Tarun & Tripathy, Jagdish, 2021. "Refinancing cross-subsidies in the mortgage market," Bank of England working papers 948, Bank of England.
    14. Balakina, Olga & Balasubramaniam, Vimal & Dimri, Aditi & Sane, Renuka, 2021. "Unshrouding product-specific attributes through financial education," Working Papers 21/344, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    15. Wong, Francis & Kermani, Amir, 2022. "Racial Disparities in Housing Returns," VfS Annual Conference 2022 (Basel): Big Data in Economics 264099, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Diversification; equities; India; Wealth Inequality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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