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The Struggle Over the Real Wage In the Monetary Production Economy

  • Hernando Matallana

    ()

Keynes contents in General Theory that the monetary market logic of the aggregate real wage in the monetary production economy conveys: (i) the determination of the average real wage rate, the level of employment, and the possibility of involuntary unemployment through the interaction of the monetary markets and the goods markets; and (ii) the determination of the money wage rate through the bargains of the firms and the workers as a market-theoretical stability condition of the economic system. Accordingly, (iii) the money wage claims of labour (in conformity with changes of the average labour productivity) do not alter the distribution of income between capital and labour; and (iv) the struggle about the money wages by different groups of workers is actually a zerosum game over the distribution of the aggregate real wage between the different fractions of the working class. The paper discusses Keynes´s contention in the context of the monetary-keynesian theory of the endogenous-money monetary production economy.

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File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/dcede2009-02.pdf
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Paper provided by UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE in its series DOCUMENTOS CEDE with number 005271.

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Length: 24
Date of creation: 08 Jan 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:col:000089:005271
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  1. Warren J. Samuels, 1988. "An Essay on the Nature and Significance of the Normative Nature of Economics," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 10(3), pages 347-354, April.
  2. L. Randall Wray, 1998. "Modern Money," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_252, Levy Economics Institute.
  3. Hernando Matallana, 2008. "A Short Guide to Long-Run Time-Phased Systems of Production," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 005101, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  4. Frank Hahn & Robert Solow, 1997. "A Critical Essay on Modern Macroeconomic Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026258154x, June.
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