IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Stochastic Volatility: Univariate and Multivariate Extensions

  • Éric Jacquier
  • Nicholas G. Polson
  • Peter E. Rossi

Stochastic volatility models, aka SVOL, are more difficult to estimate than standard time-varying volatility models (ARCH). Advances in the literature now offer well tested estimators for a basic univariate SVOL model. However, the basic model is too restrictive for many economic and finance applications. The use of the basic model can lead to biased volatility forecasts especially around crucial periods of high volatility. We extend the basic SVOL needs to allow for the leverage effect, through a correlation between observable and variance errors, and fat-tails in the conditional distribution. We develop a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm for this extended model. We also provide an algorithm to analyze a multivariate factor SVOL model. The method simultaneously performs finite sample inference and smoothing. We document the performance of the estimator and show why the extensions are warranted. We provide the researcher with a range of model diagnostics, such as the identification of outliers for stochastic volatility models or the assessment of the normality of the conditional distribution. We implement this methodology on a number of univariate financial time series. There is strong evidence of (1) non-normal conditional distributions for most series, and (2) a leverage effect for stock returns. We illustrate the robustness of the results to the choice of the prior distributions. These results have policy implications on decisions based upon prediction of volatility, especially when dealing with tail prediction as in risk management. Les modèles de volatilité stochastique, alias SVOL, sont plus durs à estimer que les modèles traditionnels de type ARCH. La littérature récente offre des estimateurs éprouvés pour un modèle SVOL univarié de base. Ce modèle est trop contraignant pour une utilisation en économie financière. Les prévisions de volatilité qu'il produit peuvent etre biaisées, particulièrement quand la volatilité est élevée. Nous généralisons le modèle de base en y ajoutant des effets de levier par le biais d'une corrélation entre les chocs observables et de variance, et la possibilité de distributions conditionnelles à queues épaisses. Nous développons un algorithme bayésien à chaînes markoviennes de Monte Carlo. Nous développons aussi un algorithme pour l'analyse d'un modèle SVOL multivarié à facteurs. Ces estimateurs permettent une inférence en échantillon fini pour les paramètres et les volatilités. Nous documentons les performances de l'estimateur et montrons que les extensions sont nécessaires. Nous testons la normalité des distributions conditionnelles. Cette méthode est mise en oeuvre sur plusieurs séries financières. Il y a une forte évidence (1) de distributions conditionnelles à queues épaisses, et (2) d'effets de levier pour les actifs financiers. Les résultats sont robustes et ont d'importantes implications sur les décisions fondées sur les prédictions de volatilité, particulièrement pour la gestion de risques.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by CIRANO in its series CIRANO Working Papers with number 99s-26.

in new window

Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: 01 Jul 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cir:cirwor:99s-26
Contact details of provider: Postal: 1130 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, suite 1400, Montréal, Quéc, H3A 2M8
Phone: (514) 985-4000
Fax: (514) 985-4039
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Peter F. Christoffersen & Francis X. Diebold, 2005. "Volatility Forecasting," PIER Working Paper Archive 05-011, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  2. John Geweke, 1992. "Priors for macroeconomic time series and their application," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 64, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  3. Glosten, Lawrence R & Jagannathan, Ravi & Runkle, David E, 1993. " On the Relation between the Expected Value and the Volatility of the Nominal Excess Return on Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(5), pages 1779-1801, December.
  4. Sangjoon Kim & Neil Shephard, 1994. "Stochastic volatility: likelihood inference and comparison with ARCH models," Economics Papers 3., Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  5. GHYSELS, Eric & HARVEY, Andrew & RENAULT, Eric, 1995. "Stochastic Volatility," CORE Discussion Papers 1995069, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  6. Hull, John C & White, Alan D, 1987. " The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(2), pages 281-300, June.
  7. Melino, Angelo & Turnbull, Stuart M., 1990. "Pricing foreign currency options with stochastic volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 239-265.
  8. Harvey, Andrew & Ruiz, Esther & Shephard, Neil, 1994. "Multivariate Stochastic Variance Models," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 247-64, April.
  9. repec:cup:etheor:v:10:y:1994:i:3-4:p:609-32 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. John Geweke & Guofu Zhou, 1995. "Measuring the pricing error of the arbitrage pricing theory," Staff Report 189, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  11. Ronald Mahieu & Peter Schotman, 1994. "Stochastic volatility and the distribution of exchange rate news," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 96, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  12. Friedman, Moshe & Harris, Lawrence, 1998. "A Maximum Likelihood Approach for Non-Gaussian Stochastic Volatility Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(3), pages 284-91, July.
  13. John F. Geweke, 1994. "Bayesian comparison of econometric models," Working Papers 532, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  14. Geweke, J, 1993. "Bayesian Treatment of the Independent Student- t Linear Model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(S), pages S19-40, Suppl. De.
  15. Jacquier, Eric & Polson, Nicholas G & Rossi, Peter E, 1994. "Bayesian Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(4), pages 371-89, October.
  16. Bollerslev, Tim & Chou, Ray Y. & Kroner, Kenneth F., 1992. "ARCH modeling in finance : A review of the theory and empirical evidence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 5-59.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cir:cirwor:99s-26. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Webmaster)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.