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Incorporating concerns for equity into health resource allocation. A guide for practitioners

Author

Listed:
  • James Love-Koh

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK)

  • Susan Griffin

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK)

  • Edward Kataika

    (East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community)

  • Paul Revill

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK)

  • Sibusiso Sibandze

    (East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community)

  • Simon Walker

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK)

Abstract

Unfair differences in health care access, quality or health outcomes exist between and within countries around the world, and improving health equity is an important social objective for many governments and international organizations. This paper summaries the methods for analysing health equity available to policymakers regarding the allocation of health sector resources.

Suggested Citation

  • James Love-Koh & Susan Griffin & Edward Kataika & Paul Revill & Sibusiso Sibandze & Simon Walker, 2019. "Incorporating concerns for equity into health resource allocation. A guide for practitioners," Working Papers 160cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:chy:respap:160cherp
    as

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    File URL: https://www.york.ac.uk/media/che/documents/papers/researchpapers/CHERP160_equity_health_resource_allocation.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Driessen, Julia & Olson, Zachary D. & Jamison, Dean T. & Verguet, Stéphane, 2015. "Comparing the health and social protection effects of measles vaccination strategies in Ethiopia: An extended cost-effectiveness analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 115-122.
    2. Miqdad Asaria & Susan Griffin & Richard Cookson & Sophie Whyte & Paul Tappenden, 2015. "Distributional Cost‐Effectiveness Analysis of Health Care Programmes – A Methodological Case Study of the UK Bowel Cancer Screening Programme," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6), pages 742-754, June.
    3. Miqdad Asaria & Susan Griffin & Richard Cookson, 2013. "Distributional cost-effectiveness analysis: a tutorial," Working Papers 092cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    4. Bleichrodt, Han & Diecidue, Enrico & Quiggin, John, 2004. "Equity weights in the allocation of health care: the rank-dependent QALY model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 157-171, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. James Love-Koh & Susan Griffin & Edward Kataika & Paul Revill & Sibusiso Sibandze & Simon Walker & Jessica Ochalek & Mark Sculpher & Matthias Arnold, 2019. "Economic analysis for health benefits package design," Working Papers 165cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.

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