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Monetary Integration in the Southern Cone: Mercosur is Not Like the EU?

  • Ansgar Belke
  • Daniel Gros

Evaluating the costs and benefits of exchange rate stability requires a somewhat different approach for Mercosur than for the EU. EU member countries are highly integrated in terms of trade in goods and services. By contrast, trade integration within Mercosur is much more limited, intra-area exchange rates are thus less important than the exchange rate vis-à-vis the dollar and the euro. This contribution analyses the impact of both aspects of financial volatility (exchange rate and interest rate volatility) on investment and labor markets in the Southern Cone, finding that both exchange rate variability (mainly against the dollar and the euro) and (domestic) interest rate volatility have a significant dampening impact on employment and investment, as predicted by our theoretical model.

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Paper provided by Central Bank of Chile in its series Working Papers Central Bank of Chile with number 188.

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Date of creation: Oct 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:188
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  1. Jeffrey Frankel & Andrew Rose, 2002. "An Estimate Of The Effect Of Common Currencies On Trade And Income," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(2), pages 437-466, May.
  2. Reinhart, Carmen & Reinhart, Vincent, 2001. "What hurts most?: G-3 exchange rate or interest rate volatility," MPRA Paper 14098, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Andrew B. Abel & Janice B. Eberly, . "The Effects of Irreversibility and Uncertainty on Capital Accumulation," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 21-95, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  4. Ansgar Belke & Daniel Gros, 2001. "Real Impacts of Intra-European Exchange Rate Variability: A Case for EMU?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 231-264, July.
  5. Pedro Portugal & Olivier Blanchard, 2001. "What Hides Behind an Unemployment Rate: Comparing Portuguese and U.S. Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 187-207, March.
  6. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2000. "Fear of Floating," NBER Working Papers 7993, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Darby, Julia, et al, 1999. "The Impact of Exchange Rate Uncertainty on the Level of Investment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(454), pages C55-67, March.
  8. Carmen M. Reinhart & Vincent Raymond Reinhart, 2002. "What Hurts Emerging Markets Most? G3 Exchange Rate or Interest Rate Volatility?," NBER Chapters, in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 133-170 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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