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The role of production technology for productivity spillovers from multinationals: Firm-level evidence for Hungary

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  • Holger Görg
  • Alexander Hijzen
  • Balázs Muraközy

Abstract

This paper analyses the potential for productivity spillovers from inward foreign direct investment using administrative panel data on firms for Hungary. We hypothesise that the potential for spillovers is related to observable characteristics of the production process of foreign affiliates, and evaluate this empirically. We further explore the role of competition in explaining productivity spillovers within industries. Our empirical analysis yields a number of important findings. First, we show that the potential for spillovers is importantly related to the production technology of the sectors and foreign affiliates. Firms that relocate labour-intensive activities to Hungary to exploit differences in labour costs are unlikely to generate productivity spillovers, while spillovers increase in the capital intensity of foreign affiliates. Second, we find that spillovers differ markedly in the early and later stages of transition, and that there are differences between small and large firms. Furthermore, foreign presence tends to affect the productivity of domestic firms negatively whenever MNEs produce for the domestic market

Suggested Citation

  • Holger Görg & Alexander Hijzen & Balázs Muraközy, 2009. "The role of production technology for productivity spillovers from multinationals: Firm-level evidence for Hungary," CeFiG Working Papers 5, Center for Firms in the Global Economy, revised 01 Feb 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:cfg:cfigwp:5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alessandro Sembenelli & Georges Siotis, 2002. "Foreign Direct Investment, Competitive Pressure and Spillovers. An Empirical Analysis on Spanish Firm Level Data," Development Working Papers 169, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    2. Bernard, Andrew B. & Bradford Jensen, J., 1999. "Exceptional exporter performance: cause, effect, or both?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 1-25, February.
    3. James R. Markusen, 2004. "Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262633078, January.
    4. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
    5. Beata Smarzynska Javorcik, 2004. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Increase the Productivity of Domestic Firms? In Search of Spillovers Through Backward Linkages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 605-627, June.
    6. repec:wsi:wschap:9789814749237_0010 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Davide Castellani & Antonello Zanfei, 2006. "Multinational Firms, Innovation and Productivity," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3709.
    8. James Levinsohn & Amil Petrin, 2003. "Estimating Production Functions Using Inputs to Control for Unobservables," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(2), pages 317-341.
    9. Sourafel Girma & Holger Görg & Mauro Pisu, 2016. "Exporting, linkages and productivity spillovers from foreign direct investment," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES AND HOST COUNTRY DEVELOPMENT Volume 53: World Scientific Studies in International Economics, chapter 10, pages 191-211 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    10. Gorg, Holger & Strobl, Eric, 2001. "Multinational Companies and Productivity Spillovers: A Meta-analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(475), pages 723-739, November.
    11. K. Schoors & B. Van Der Tol, 2002. "Foreign direct investment spillovers within and between sectors: Evidence from Hungarian data," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 02/157, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    12. Moulton, Brent R, 1990. "An Illustration of a Pitfall in Estimating the Effects of Aggregate Variables on Micro Unit," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 334-338, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Farkas, Beáta, 2011. "A közép-kelet-európai piacgazdaságok fejlődési lehetőségei az Európai Unióban
      [The development opportunities for the Central-East European market economies within the European Union]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 412-429.
    2. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Tokunaga, Masahiro, 2016. "Technology transfer and spillovers from FDI in transition economies: A meta-analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 1086-1114.
    3. Vasileios A. Vlachos & Dimitris Kalimeris, 2010. "International business spillovers in emerging markets: the Visegrad group," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(4), pages 330-345.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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