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Growth, Longevity and Public Policy

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  • Gregory Ponthiere

Abstract

This paper studies the optimal long-run public intervention in a two-period OLG model where the probability of surviving the first period and the length of the second period can be influenced by distinct policies. While the optimal size of public intervention depends on the extra-productivity of public spendings in longevity, its optimal structure is determined by (1) differences in the productivity of each policy; (2) how growth would influence each longevity aspect under laissez-faire; (3) the dependence of each longevity aspect on past achievements. Given competing effects, the optimal intervention can hardly, under additive expected lifetime utility, be strongly unbalanced.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Ponthiere, 2006. "Growth, Longevity and Public Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 1780, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1780
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp1780.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kelvin R. Utendorf & Rowena A. Pecchenino, 1999. "Social security, social welfare and the aging population," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 607-623.
    2. Chakraborty, Shankha, 2004. "Endogenous lifetime and economic growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 116(1), pages 119-137, May.
    3. Samuel H. Preston, 1980. "Causes and Consequences of Mortality Declines in Less Developed Countries during the Twentieth Century," NBER Chapters,in: Population and Economic Change in Developing Countries, pages 289-360 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Lant Pritchett & Lawrence H. Summers, 1996. "Wealthier is Healthier," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 841-868.
    5. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:9:y:2004:i:3:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:rus:hseeco:71105 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Sudhir Anand & Martin Ravallion, 1993. "Human Development in Poor Countries: On the Role of Private Incomes and Public Services," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 133-150, Winter.
    8. John Wilmoth & Shiro Horiuchi, 1999. "Rectangularization revisited: Variability of age at death within human populations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(4), pages 475-495, November.
    9. Rosa Aísa & Fernando Pueyo, 2004. "Endogenous longevity, health and economic growth: a slow growth for a longer life?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(3), pages 1-10.
    10. Jocelyn E. Finlay, 2006. "Endogenous Longevity and Economic Growth," PGDA Working Papers 0706, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    11. Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Qiao, Xue, 2005. "Public and Private Expenditures on Health in a Growth Model," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12378, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre Pestieau & Gregory Ponthiere & Motohiro Sato, 2008. "Longevity, Health Spending, and Pay-as-you-Go Pensions," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 64(1), pages 1-18, March.
    2. PESTIEAU, Pierre & PONTHIÈRE, Grégory & SATO, Motohiro, 2006. "Longevity and Pay-as-you-Go pensions," CORE Discussion Papers 2006054, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    growth; longevity; public policy; rectangularization;

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