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Rectangularization and the rise in limit longevity in a simple overlapping generations model

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  • Grégory Ponthière

    (PJSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

Abstract

Whereas overlapping generations (OLG) models with endogenous longevity do not distinguish between the rectangularization phenomenon and the rise in limit-longevity, these constitute two different demographic phenomena requiring a distinct modelling. This paper presents a two-period OLG model where the probability of survival from the first to the second period, as well as the maximum length of life, are endogenously determined and influenced by public policies. The issues of existence, uniqueness and stability of a steady state are studied. It is shown that the transition towards the steady state exhibits, under mild conditions, the observed succession of phases of rectangularization and derectangularization of survival curves.

Suggested Citation

  • Grégory Ponthière, 2009. "Rectangularization and the rise in limit longevity in a simple overlapping generations model," Post-Print halshs-00754324, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00754324
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9957.2009.02125.x
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-pjse.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00754324
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    Cited by:

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    3. David Croix & Pierre Pestieau & Grégory Ponthière, 2012. "How powerful is demography? The Serendipity Theorem revisited," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 899-922, July.
    4. Shin, Inyong, 2012. "The Effect of Pension on the Optimized Life Expectancy and Lifetime Utility Level," MPRA Paper 41374, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Inyong Shin, 2018. "Could pension system make us happier?," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 1452342-145, January.

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