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The Effect of Internet Piracy on CD Sales: Cross-Section Evidence

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  • Martin Peitz
  • Patrick Waelbroeck

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  • Martin Peitz & Patrick Waelbroeck, 2004. "The Effect of Internet Piracy on CD Sales: Cross-Section Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 1122, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1122
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp1122.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hui Kai-Lung & Png Ivan, 2003. "Piracy and the Legitimate Demand for Recorded Music," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-24, September.
    2. Martin Peitz & Patrick Waelbroeck, 2003. "Piracy of Digital Products: A Critical Review of the Economics Literature," CESifo Working Paper Series 1071, CESifo Group Munich.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francisco Vázquez & Richard Watt, 2011. "Copyright piracy as prey–predator behavior," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 31-43, April.
    2. Godefroy Nguyen & Sylvain Dejean & François Moreau, 2014. "On the complementarity between online and offline music consumption: the case of free streaming," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(4), pages 315-330, November.
    3. Iacopo Grassi, 2007. "The Music Market in the Age of Download," Working Papers 2007.80, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    4. Lonnie Stevans & David Sessions, 2005. "An Empirical Investigation Into the Effect of Music Downloading on the Consumer Expenditure of Recorded Music: A Time Series Approach," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 311-324, September.
    5. Martin Peitz & Patrick Waelbroeck, 2005. "An Economist's Guide to Digital Music," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 51(2-3), pages 359-428.
    6. Stefano Comino & Fabio Maria Manenti, 2015. "Intellectual Property and Innovation in Information and Communication Technology (ICT)," JRC Working Papers JRC97541, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    7. Birgitte Andersen & Marion Frenz, 2010. "Don’t blame the P2P file-sharers: the impact of free music downloads on the purchase of music CDs in Canada," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 20(5), pages 715-740, October.
    8. repec:wsi:ijmpcx:v:20:y:2009:i:11:n:s0129183109014680 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Connolly, Marie & Krueger, Alan B., 2006. "Rockonomics: The Economics of Popular Music," Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, Elsevier.
    10. Clayton Davies & Glenn Parry & Janet Carruthers & Marcus Kepple-Palmer, 2015. "The Epistemological Foundations of Music Piracy in the Digital Marketplace," Foresight and STI Governance (Foresight-Russia till No. 3/2015), National Research University Higher School of Economics, vol. 9(4), pages 42-53.
    11. Jehoshua Eliashberg & Anita Elberse & Mark A.A.M. Leenders, 2006. "The Motion Picture Industry: Critical Issues in Practice, Current Research, and New Research Directions," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 25(6), pages 638-661, 11-12.
    12. Piolatto, Amedeo & Schuett, Florian, 2012. "Music piracy: A case of “The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Poorer”," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 30-39.
    13. Handke, Christian, 2012. "Digital copying and the supply of sound recordings," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 15-29.
    14. Peitz, Martin & Waelbroeck, Patrick, 2006. "Why the music industry may gain from free downloading -- The role of sampling," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 907-913, September.
    15. Handke, Christian & Girard, Yann & Mattes, Anselm, 2015. "Fördert das Urheberrecht Innovation? Eine empirische Untersuchung," Studien zum deutschen Innovationssystem 16-2015, Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation (EFI) - Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation, Berlin.
    16. Danaher, Brett & Smith, Michael D., 2014. "Gone in 60 Seconds: The Impact of the Megaupload Shutdown on Movie Sales," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-8.
    17. Sana El Harbi & Gilles Grolleau & Insaf Bekir, 2014. "Substituting piracy with a pay-what-you-want option: does it make sense?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 277-297, April.
    18. Felix Oberholzer-Gee & Koleman Strumpf, 2010. "File Sharing and Copyright," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 10, pages 19-55 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Martin Peitz & Patrick Waelbroeck, 2004. "An Economist’s Guide to Digital Music," CESifo Working Paper Series 1333, CESifo Group Munich.
    20. Juan Montoro Pons & Manuel Cuadrado García, 2008. "Legal origin and intellectual property rights: an empirical study in the prerecorded music sector," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 153-173, October.
    21. Jonathan Dörr & Thomas Wagner & Alexander Benlian & Thomas Hess, 2013. "Music as a Service as an Alternative to Music Piracy?," Business & Information Systems Engineering: The International Journal of WIRTSCHAFTSINFORMATIK, Springer;Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. (GI), vol. 5(6), pages 383-396, December.
    22. Ivan Png, 2006. "Copyright: A Plea for Empirical Research," Levine's Working Paper Archive 321307000000000484, David K. Levine.
    23. Wojciech Hardy & Michal Krawczyk & Joanna Tyrowicz, 2015. "Friends or foes? A meta-analysis of the link between "online piracy" and sales of cultural goods," Working Papers 2015-23, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    24. Scott Hiller, R., 2016. "Sales displacement and streaming music: Evidence from YouTube," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 16-26.
    25. Peitz, Martin & Waelbroeck, Patrick, 2004. "File-Sharing, Sampling, and Music Distribution," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 31, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    piracy; music; peer-to-peer; internet; survey data; cross-country regressions;

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