IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cen/wpaper/13-34.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Industrial Concentration of Ethnic Minority- and Women-Owned Businesses in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Qingfang Wang

Abstract

The number of ethnic minority and women-owned businesses has increased rapidly during the past few decades. However, the characteristics of these businesses and their owners differ by race, ethnicity, and gender. Using a confidential national survey of ethnic minority and women-owned businesses in the United States, this study examines ethnic minority- and women-owned businesses segmented by industrial sectors. Consistent with gender occupational segregation, male- and female- owned businesses have distinctive sectoral concentration patterns, with ethnic minority women- owned businesses highly concentrated in a limited number of industrial sectors. However, the relationship between business sectoral concentration and business performance is not uniform across ethnic and gender groups. Concentration in specific industrial sectors does not necessarily mean poor performance when measured by sales, size of employment or payrolls. However, for women-owned businesses, those sectors obviously pay less and have marginal profits, especially if considering the size of the firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Qingfang Wang, 2013. "Industrial Concentration of Ethnic Minority- and Women-Owned Businesses in the United States," Working Papers 13-34, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:13-34
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/2013/CES-WP-13-34.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert W. Fairlie & Alicia M. Robb, 2008. "Race and Entrepreneurial Success: Black-, Asian-, and White-Owned Businesses in the United States," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026206281x, January.
    2. Susan Hanson & Megan Blake, 2009. "Gender and Entrepreneurial Networks," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(1), pages 135-149.
    3. Megan K Blake & Susan Hanson, 2005. "Rethinking innovation: context and gender," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 37(4), pages 681-701, April.
    4. Maria Minniti & Carlo Nardone, 2007. "Being in Someone Else’s Shoes: the Role of Gender in Nascent Entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 223-238, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ethnic business; female entrepreneurship; labor market segmentation; gender;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:13-34. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dawn Anderson). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cesgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.