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Interpreting a crisis: trade and money debates in England during the parliament of 1621

  • Carlos Eduardo Suprinyak

    (Cedeplar-UFMG)

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    The parliament of 1621 witnessed extensive debating of economic issues by those engaged in finding solutions for the exacting crisis which then affected England. These proceedings offer the background against which some of the most relevant economic literature of the period was produced. As debates progressed, two contrasting perspectives gradually emerged. One of them argued that monetary imbalances were responsible for bullion outflows and sluggish economic activity, while the other believed that monetary flows were ultimately caused by an unfavorable balance of trade. These were exactly the same issues at stake in the controversy between Malynes and Misselden in the early 1620’s, to which Mun would provide a solution with his strict adherence to the balance of trade. Thus, through an analysis of economic debates in the 1621 parliament, this paper seeks to offer an essential element for understanding early XVII century British economic reasoning.

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    File URL: http://www.cedeplar.ufmg.br/pesquisas/td/TD%20373.pdf
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    Paper provided by Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in its series Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG with number td373.

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    Length: 24 pages
    Date of creation: Nov 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:cdp:texdis:td373
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    1. Kindleberger, Charles P., 1991. "The Economic Crisis of 1619 to 1623," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(01), pages 149-175, March.
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