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Distributional impacts of taxing carbon in China: a general equilibrium analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Qiao-Mei Liang
  • Yi-Ming Wei

    () (Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology)

Abstract

This study aims to examine how mitigating CO2 through a carbon tax might affect the development goals of narrowing urban-rural gap and improving people's living standard. In this study, the China Energy & Environmental Policy Analysis (CEEPA) model, a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium model, was employed to simulate taxing carbon in China. Different carbon tax schemes were designed and their impacts on household disposable income, household welfare, economic growth, and CO2 emissions were compared. Results show that, given the current social security system that obviously favors urban households and the current investment-driven economic growth pattern, without complementary measures for protecting households, a carbon tax will not only widen the urban-rural gap, but also reduce the living standards of both urban and rural households. The negative impacts caused by carbon tax will enlarge over time. An ideal solution, no matter under an emission intensity goal or a total amount control goal, is to reduce indirect tax with carbon tax revenue, whilst increase the share rural households obtain in government transfers.

Suggested Citation

  • Qiao-Mei Liang & Yi-Ming Wei, 2011. "Distributional impacts of taxing carbon in China: a general equilibrium analysis," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 29, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:biw:wpaper:29
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    File URL: http://ceep.bit.edu.cn/docs/2018-10/20181011135247398506.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zhang, ZhongXiang & Baranzini, Andrea, 2004. "What do we know about carbon taxes? An inquiry into their impacts on competitiveness and distribution of income," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 507-518, March.
    2. Liang, Qiao-Mei & Fan, Ying & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2007. "Carbon taxation policy in China: How to protect energy- and trade-intensive sectors?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 311-333.
    3. Callan, Tim & Lyons, Sean & Scott, Susan & Tol, Richard S.J. & Verde, Stefano, 2009. "The distributional implications of a carbon tax in Ireland," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 407-412, February.
    4. Baranzini, Andrea & Goldemberg, Jose & Speck, Stefan, 2000. "A future for carbon taxes," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 395-412, March.
    5. Tiezzi, Silvia, 2005. "The welfare effects and the distributive impact of carbon taxation on Italian households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 1597-1612, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Carbon tax; computable general equilibrium; income distribution;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models

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