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Macroeconomic Performance, Individual Characteristics and Preference for Democracy

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  • Maryia Akulava

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Abstract

What affects individual preference for different types of political regime? This paper investigates the determinants of individual preferences for democratic values and looks at differences in impact of influencing factors in transition and non-transition countries. It combines both individual and country level characteristics in order to see whether they impact personÕs attitude. I found that preferences for democracy are formed by impact of both individual and country-level factors. However, the direction of impact depends on the type of political regime and stage of economic development in the country. First, GDP per capita, growth of inequality and inflation are positively affecting personal preferences for democratic values in the democratic countries and negatively in the countries with autocratic regime. In turn, growth of unemployment in democratic countries decreases individual support of democracy and has a positive impact on support in the countries with autocratic regime. That agrees with the literature that beliefs and attitude towards political systems depend on countryÕs past experience. Age has different effect in transition and non-transition economies proving that being raised in different environments matters in terms of formation of political preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Maryia Akulava, 2014. "Macroeconomic Performance, Individual Characteristics and Preference for Democracy," BEROC Working Paper Series 25, Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC).
  • Handle: RePEc:bel:wpaper:25
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Daron Acemoglu & Suresh Naidu & Pascual Restrepo & James A. Robinson, 2019. "Democracy Does Cause Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 127(1), pages 47-100.
    5. Papaioannou, Elias & Siourounis, Gregorios, 2008. "Economic and social factors driving the third wave of democratization," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 365-387, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Torbjörn Becker & Helena Schweiger & Igor Livshits & Bas B. Bakker & Tymofiy Mylovanov, 2018. "The future of CIS and CEE countries," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 26(4), pages 801-826, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Democracy; macroeconomic factors; individual characteristics; transition countries;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • P1 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

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