IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aare06/139881.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Social costs of herbicide resistance: the case of resistance to glyphosate

Author

Listed:
  • Marsh, Sally P.
  • Llewellyn, Rick S.
  • Powles, Stephen B.

Abstract

Social costs and externalities associated with herbicide resistance have not generally been considered by economists. The economics of managing herbicide resistance in weeds has focused on cost-effective responses by growers to the development of resistance at the individual farm and field level. In this paper we argue that the increasing possibility of widespread glyphosate resistance presents a case where social costs associated with glyphosate resistance need to be considered when assessing optimal use of this herbicide resource at the farm level. Social costs associated with the loss of glyphosate efficacy include potential failure of herbicide-resistant crop systems, reduced use of conservation tillage techniques, and a potential greater reliance on herbicides with greater health and environmental risks.

Suggested Citation

  • Marsh, Sally P. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Powles, Stephen B., 2006. "Social costs of herbicide resistance: the case of resistance to glyphosate," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 139881, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare06:139881
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.139881
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/139881/files/2006_marsh.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.22004/ag.econ.139881?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Solow, Robert M, 1974. "The Economics of Resources or the Resources of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 1-14, May.
    2. Sandra S. Batie, 2003. "The Environmental Impacts of Genetically Modified Plants: Challenges to Decision Making," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1107-1111.
    3. Mike Young, 1999. "Costing Dust: How much does wind erosion cost the people of South Australia?," Natural Resource Management Economics 99_001, Policy and Economic Research Unit, CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide, Australia.
    4. Laxminarayan, Ramanan, 2003. "ACT Now or Later: The Economics of Malaria Resistance," Discussion Papers dp-03-51, Resources For the Future.
    5. John D. Mullenn & Julian M. Alston & Daniel A. Sumner & Marcia T. Kreith & Nicolai V. Kuminoff, 2005. "The Payoff to Public Investments in Pest-Management R&D: General Issues and a Case Study Emphasizing Integrated Pest Management in California," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 558-573.
    6. D. Hueth & U. Regev, 1974. "Optimal Agricultural Pest Management with Increasing Pest Resistance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 56(3), pages 543-552.
    7. Babcock, Bruce A. & Secchi, Silvia, 2003. "Pest Mobility, Market Share, and the Efficacy of Refuge Requirements for Resisance Management," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10383, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Amitrajeet Batabyal & Peter Nijkamp, 2005. "Alternate strategies for managing resistance to antibiotics and pesticides," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 7(1), pages 39-51, March.
    2. Desquilbet, Marion & Hermann, Markus, 2012. "An assessment of bioeconomic modeling of pest resistance with new insights into dynamic refuge fields," TSE Working Papers 12-263, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    3. Stefan Ambec & Marion Desquilbet, 2012. "Regulation of a Spatial Externality: Refuges versus Tax for Managing Pest Resistance," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 51(1), pages 79-104, January.
    4. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Hoang, Thi Hong Van & Mahalik, Mantu Kumar & Roubaud, David, 2017. "Energy consumption, financial development and economic growth in India: New evidence from a nonlinear and asymmetric analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 199-212.
    5. Dale W. Henderson & Stephen W. Salant, 1976. "Market anticipations, government policy, and the price of gold," International Finance Discussion Papers 81, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Hala Abu-Kalla & Ruslana Rachel Palatnik & Ofira Ayalon & Mordechai Shechter, 2020. "Hoard or Exploit? Intergenerational Allocation of Exhaustible Natural Resources," Energies, MDPI, vol. 13(24), pages 1-20, December.
    7. Grimaud, Andre & Rouge, Luc, 2003. "Non-renewable resources and growth with vertical innovations: optimum, equilibrium and economic policies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2, Supple), pages 433-453, March.
    8. Marion Gaspard & Antoine Missemer, 2019. "An inquiry into the Ramsey-Hotelling connection," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 352-379, March.
    9. Olson, Kent D. & Badibanga, Thaddee Mutumba, 2005. "A Bioeconomic Model of the Soybean Aphid Treatment Decision in Soybeans," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19237, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Gardner Brown & Ramanan Laxminarayan, 1998. "Economics of Antibiotic Resistance," Working Papers 0060, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    11. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Fisher, Anthony C, 1981. "Hotelling's "Economics of Exhaustible Resources": Fifty Years Later," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 65-73, March.
    12. Köhn, Jörg, 1996. "Thinking in Terms of System Hierarchies and Velocites. What makes Development Sustainable?," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 04, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
    13. Barbier, Bruno & Bergeron, Gilles, 2001. "Natural resource management in the hillsides of Honduras: bioeconomic modeling at the micro-watershed level," Research reports 123, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Anderson, Soren T. & Laxminarayan, Ramanan & Salant, Stephen W., 2012. "Diversify or focus? Spending to combat infectious diseases when budgets are tight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 658-675.
    15. Jean Christophe Graz & Michel Damian & Mehdi Abbas, 2007. "Towards an evolutionary environmental regulation of capitalism : sustainable development 20 years after," Post-Print halshs-00369962, HAL.
    16. Franco, Marco P.V. & Gaspard, Marion & Mueller, Thomas, 2019. "Time discounting in Harold Hotelling's approach to natural resource economics: The unsolved ethical question," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 52-60.
    17. Benchekroun, Hassan & Ray Chaudhuri, Amrita & Tasneem, Dina, 2020. "On the impact of trade in a common property renewable resource oligopoly," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).
    18. Oleg Yerokhin & GianCarlo Moschini, 2008. "Intellectual Property Rights and Crop-Improving R&D under Adaptive Destruction," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 53-72, May.
    19. John, A. & Pecchenino, R. & Schmmelpfennig, D. & Schreft, S., 1990. "External Increasing Returns , Short-Lived Agents and Long- Lived Waste," Papers 8903, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.
    20. Sorin-George Toma & Paul Marinescu & Catalin Gradinaru, 2016. "The Age Of Sustainable Business Models," Management Strategies Journal, Constantin Brancoveanu University, vol. 34(4), pages 128-132.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aare06:139881. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/aaresea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: AgEcon Search (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/aaresea.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.