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Avian Influenza Threat and its Potential Impact on Demand for Chicken and Eggs

  • Liu, Kang Ernest
  • Huang, Min-Hsin
  • Hsu, Jane Lu
  • Lee, Hwang-Jaw
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    A highly pathogenic H5N1 strain of avian influenza (AI) has been confirmed in 420 human cases and has caused 257 deaths in the world starting from 2003. Using face-to-face interviews, our data were collected by utilizing a stratified sampling scheme following the distribution of gender and age in three major metropolitan areas in Taiwan, including Taipei, Taichung, and Kaohsiung. The questionnaire was designed to retrieve information including AI knowledge, risk perceptions, and behavioral changes of two types of consumers, primary shoppers and general consumers. In total, 501 primary shoppers and 505 general consumers completed the survey in June 2007 and were recorded for analysis. The empirical results show several interesting findings, especially, that risk perception and some socioeconomic characteristics such as age are the key factor which determines changes in purchasing behavior.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/49297
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    Paper provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its series 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin with number 49297.

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    Date of creation: 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea09:49297
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    1. McDonald, John F & Moffitt, Robert A, 1980. "The Uses of Tobit Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(2), pages 318-21, May.
    2. Takashi Ishida & Noriko Ishikawa & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2006. "Impact of BSE and Bird Flu on Consumersf Meat Demand in Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 06-01, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
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