IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aaea04/20238.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Demand- and Supply-Side Spillovers in the Food Manufacturing Industry in Korea: An Empirical Evidence from Both Local Level and Individual Firm Level

Author

Listed:
  • An, Donghwan
  • Kim, Kwansoo
  • Kwon, Oh Sang

Abstract

From the perspective of the food system, the overall food manufacturing or processing industry is fundamentally connected both with agricultural production in rural areas and consumption demand usually concentrated in urban areas. Using the local government level and individual firm level data for the food manufacturing industry in Korea, this paper investigated the agglomeration and spillover effects in this industry. This study found that there exist significant productivity differentials over space in food processing industry. This paper also found the evidences of agglomeration economies; the place where the size of population is large performs better. The results showed some evidences of spillover effects; negative externalities from congestions of neighbors and positive spillovers of the increasing accessibility to material input producers in the neighboring regions.

Suggested Citation

  • An, Donghwan & Kim, Kwansoo & Kwon, Oh Sang, 2004. "The Demand- and Supply-Side Spillovers in the Food Manufacturing Industry in Korea: An Empirical Evidence from Both Local Level and Individual Firm Level," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20238, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20238
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/20238
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Henderson, Vernon & Lee, Todd & Lee, Yung Joon, 2001. "Scale Externalities in Korea," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 479-504, May.
    2. Henderson, J. Vernon, 1986. "Efficiency of resource usage and city size," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 47-70, January.
    3. Cohen, Jeffrey P. & Morrison Paul, Catherine J., 2001. "Agglomeration Economies and Industry Location Decisions: The Impacts of Vertical and Horizontal Spillovers," Working Papers 190899, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    4. Eberts, Randall W. & McMillen, Daniel P., 1999. "Agglomeration economies and urban public infrastructure," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: P. C. Cheshire & E. S. Mills (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 38, pages 1455-1495 Elsevier.
    5. Battese, G E & Coelli, T J, 1995. "A Model for Technical Inefficiency Effects in a Stochastic Frontier Production Function for Panel Data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 325-332.
    6. Oulton,Nicholas & O'Mahony,Mary, 1994. "Productivity and Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521453455, March.
    7. Patricia E. Beeson & Steven Husted, 1986. "Patterns and determinants of inefficiency in state manufacturing," Working Paper 8603, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    8. Vernon Henderson, 1999. "Marshall's Economies," NBER Working Papers 7358, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Cohen, Jeffrey P. & Paul, Catherine J. Morrison, 2005. "Agglomeration economies and industry location decisions: the impacts of spatial and industrial spillovers," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 215-237, May.
    10. Domazlicky, Bruce R. & Weber, William, L., 1998. "Determinants of Total Factor Productivity, Technological Change, and Efficiency Differentials Among States, 1977-86," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(2), pages 19-34, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agribusiness;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20238. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.