IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/elg/eechap/14843_20.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

How big is too big? On the social efficiency of the financial sector in the United States

In: Capitalism on Trial

Author

Listed:
  • Gerald Epstein
  • James Crotty

Abstract

This volume presents a collection of essays honoring Professor Thomas E. Weisskopf, one of the most prominent contributors to the field of radical economics. Beginning his academic career at Harvard before moving to the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Professor Weisskopf has spent the past forty years exploring through highly innovative and rigorous research the questions of economic equality, social justice and environmental responsibility. The chapters in this book reflect the main subjects of Professor Weisskopf’s work and seek to foster continued innovation in these research areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerald Epstein & James Crotty, 2013. "How big is too big? On the social efficiency of the financial sector in the United States," Chapters,in: Capitalism on Trial, chapter 20 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14843_20
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781781003602.00032.xml
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elul Ronel, 1995. "Welfare Effects of Financial Innovation in Incomplete Markets Economies with Several Consumption Goods," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 43-78, February.
    2. John D. Finnerty, 1992. "An Overview Of Corporate Securities Innovation," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 4(4), pages 23-39.
    3. James Crotty, 2009. "Structural causes of the global financial crisis: a critical assessment of the 'new financial architecture'," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(4), pages 563-580, July.
    4. Lerner, Josh, 2006. "The new new financial thing: The origins of financial innovations," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 223-255, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:mes:postke:v:39:y:2016:i:4:p:444-472 is not listed on IDEAS

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14843_20. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darrel McCalla). General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.