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Oscar Parkyn

Personal Details

First Name:Oscar
Middle Name:
Last Name:Parkyn
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppa959
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Treasury
Government of New Zealand

Wellington, New Zealand
http://www.treasury.govt.nz/

: +64 4 472 2733
+64 4 473 0982
PO Box 3724, Wellington
RePEc:edi:tregvnz (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Oscar Parkyn & Tugrul Vehbi, 2013. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy in New Zealand: Evidence from a VAR Model with Debt Constraints," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/02, New Zealand Treasury.
  2. Matthew Bell & Gary Blick & Oscar Parkyn & Paul Rodway & Polly Vowles, 2010. "Challenges and Choices: Modelling New Zealand’s Long-term Fiscal Position," Treasury Working Paper Series 10/01, New Zealand Treasury.
  3. Oscar Parkyn, 2010. "Estimating New Zealand's Structural Budget Balance," Treasury Working Paper Series 10/08, New Zealand Treasury.
  4. Timothy Irwin & Oscar Parkyn, 2009. "Improving the Management of the Crown’s Exposure to Risk," Treasury Working Paper Series 09/06, New Zealand Treasury.

Articles

  1. Oscar Parkyn & Tugrul Vehbi, 2014. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy in New Zealand: Evidence from a VAR Model with Debt Constraints," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 90(290), pages 345-364, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Oscar Parkyn & Tugrul Vehbi, 2013. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy in New Zealand: Evidence from a VAR Model with Debt Constraints," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/02, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. BOUNADER, Lahcen, 2016. "Is there a crowding-out effect in the Moroccan context ? Evidence from structural VAR Analysis," MPRA Paper 69275, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Stanova, Nadja, 2015. "Effects of fiscal shocks in new EU members estimated from a SVARX model with debt feedback," MPRA Paper 63148, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Razzak, Weshah, 2013. "An Empirical Study of Sectoral-Level Capital Investments in New Zealand," MPRA Paper 52461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Sebastian Gechert & Ansgar Rannenberg, 2014. "Are Fiscal Multipliers Regime-Dependent? A Meta Regression Analysis," IMK Working Paper 139-2014, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    5. Groenewold, Nicolaas, 2018. "Australia saved from the financial crisis by policy or by exports?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 118-135.
    6. Martin Fukač & Robert Kirkby, 2017. "Accounting for Uncertainty in Public Debt Targets," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 50(1), pages 89-102, March.
    7. Jamie Murray, 2013. "Parameter Uncertainty and the Fiscal Multiplier," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/19, New Zealand Treasury.

  2. Matthew Bell & Gary Blick & Oscar Parkyn & Paul Rodway & Polly Vowles, 2010. "Challenges and Choices: Modelling New Zealand’s Long-term Fiscal Position," Treasury Working Paper Series 10/01, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. Robert A Buckle & Amy A Cruickshank, 2013. "The Requirements for Long-Run Fiscal Sustainability," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/20, New Zealand Treasury.
    2. Werner Schule, 2010. "The Potential Contribution of Fiscal Policy to Rebalancing and Growth in New Zealand," IMF Working Papers 10/128, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Ross Guest, 2013. "Population Ageing and Productivity: Implications and Policy Options for New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/21, New Zealand Treasury.
    4. John Creedy & Norman Gemmell, 2013. "Can Automatic Tax Increases Pay for the Public Spending Effects of Population Ageing in New Zealand?," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/22, New Zealand Treasury.
    5. Lees, Kirdan, 2013. "Fighting fit? Assessing New Zealand’s fiscal sustainability," NZIER Working Paper 2013/5, New Zealand Institute of Economic Research.
    6. International Monetary Fund, 2010. "New Zealand; Selected Issues Paper," IMF Staff Country Reports 10/145, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Ross Guest, 2013. "Intergenerational Smoothing of New Zealand’s Future Fiscal Costs," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/12, New Zealand Treasury.

  3. Oscar Parkyn, 2010. "Estimating New Zealand's Structural Budget Balance," Treasury Working Paper Series 10/08, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. Philip R. Lane, 2013. "External imbalances and macroeconomic policy," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 53-70, April.
    2. Dhritidyuti Bose & Renee Philip & Richard Sullivan, 2016. "Returning to Surplus: New Zealand's Post-GFC Fiscal Consolidation Experience," Treasury Working Paper Series 16/05, New Zealand Treasury.
    3. Oscar Parkyn & Tugrul Vehbi, 2013. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy in New Zealand: Evidence from a VAR Model with Debt Constraints," CAMA Working Papers 2013-04, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    4. Miles Workman, 2015. "Estimating the Cyclically- and Absorption-adjusted Fiscal Balance for New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 15/09, New Zealand Treasury.
    5. Bruce White, 2013. "Macroeconomic Policy in New Zealand: From the Great Inflation to the Global Financial Crisis," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/30, New Zealand Treasury.
    6. Philip R. Lane, 2011. "External Imbalances and Macroeconomic Policy in New Zealand," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp376, IIIS.

Articles

  1. Oscar Parkyn & Tugrul Vehbi, 2014. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy in New Zealand: Evidence from a VAR Model with Debt Constraints," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 90(290), pages 345-364, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2010-04-17 2013-03-02. Author is listed
  2. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2013-03-02 2013-04-27. Author is listed
  3. NEP-RMG: Risk Management (1) 2010-04-17. Author is listed

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