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Julie Riise

Personal Details

First Name:Julie
Middle Name:
Last Name:Riise
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pko422
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(99%) Institutt for Økonomi
Universitetet i Bergen

Bergen, Norway
http://www.uib.no/econ/

: (+47)55589200
(+47)55589210
Fosswinckelsgate 14, N-5007 Bergen
RePEc:edi:iouibno (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Uni Rokkansenteret (Uni Rokkan Centre)

http://rokkan.uni.no/
Norway, Bergen

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Loken, Katrine Vellesen & Lundberg, Shelly & Riise, Julie, 2014. "Lifting the Burden: State Care of the Elderly and Labor Supply of Adult Children," IZA Discussion Papers 8267, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Arne Risa Hole & Julie Riise Kolstad & Dorte Gyrd-Hansen, 2012. "Inferred vs Stated Attribute Non-Attendance in Choice Experiments: A Study of Doctors' Prescription Behaviour," Working Papers 2012010, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  3. Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise, 2010. "Mixed logit estimation of willingness to pay distributions: a comparison of models in preference and WTP space using data from a health-related choice experiment," Working Papers in Economics 03/10, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  4. Kolstad, Julie Riise & Lindkvist, Ida, 2010. "Pro-social preferences and self-selection into the public health sector: evidence from economic experiments," Working Papers in Economics 04/10, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  5. Kolstad, Julie Riise, 2010. "How does additional education affect willingness to work in rural remote areas?," Working Papers in Economics 02/10, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  6. Kolstad, Julie Riise, 2008. "How to make rural jobs more attractive to health workers. Findings from a discrete choice experiment in Tanzania," Working Papers in Economics 15/08, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Line Bjørnskov Pedersen & Julie Riise & Arne Risa Hole & Dorte Gyrd-Hansen, 2014. "GPs' shifting agencies in choice of treatment," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(7), pages 750-761, March.
  2. Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte, 2013. "Inferred vs. stated attribute non-attendance in choice experiments: A study of doctors’ prescription behaviour," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 21-31.
  3. Julie Riise Kolstad, 2013. "How Does Additional Education Affect Willingness to Work in Rural Remote Areas in Low-Income Contexts? An Application on Health Workers in Tanzania," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 301-314, February.
  4. Arne Hole & Julie Kolstad, 2012. "Mixed logit estimation of willingness to pay distributions: a comparison of models in preference and WTP space using data from a health-related choice experiment," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 445-469, April.
  5. Carlsen, Benedicte & Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Norheim, Ole Frithjof, 2012. "When you can’t have the cake and eat it too," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(11), pages 1964-1973.
  6. Julie Riise Kolstad, 2011. "How to make rural jobs more attractive to health workers. Findings from a discrete choice experiment in Tanzania," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 196-211, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Loken, Katrine Vellesen & Lundberg, Shelly & Riise, Julie, 2014. "Lifting the Burden: State Care of the Elderly and Labor Supply of Adult Children," IZA Discussion Papers 8267, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Geyer & Thorben Korfhage, 2015. "Long-Term Care Reform and the Labor Supply of Household Members: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 785, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Heger, Dörte & Korfhage, Thorben, 2016. "Care choices in Europe: To each according to his needs?," Ruhr Economic Papers 649, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Geyer, J.; Korfhage, T.;, 2017. "Long-term care reform and the labor supply of informal caregivers – evidence from a quasi-experiment," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/20, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

  2. Arne Risa Hole & Julie Riise Kolstad & Dorte Gyrd-Hansen, 2012. "Inferred vs Stated Attribute Non-Attendance in Choice Experiments: A Study of Doctors' Prescription Behaviour," Working Papers 2012010, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Nguyen, Thanh Cong & Robinson, Jackie & Whitty, Jennifer A. & Kaneko, Shinji & Nguyen, The Chinh, 2015. "Attribute non-attendance in discrete choice experiments: A case study in a developing country," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 22-33.
    2. Riise, Julie & Hole, Arne Risa & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte & Skåtun, Diane, 2015. "GPs’ implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services," Working Papers in Economics 02/15, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    3. Chavez, Daniel & Palma, Marco & Collart, Alba J., 2016. "Eye Tracking to Model Attribute Attendance," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230011, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. Krucien, Nicolas & Ryan, Mandy & Hermens, Frouke, 2017. "Visual attention in multi-attributes choices: What can eye-tracking tell us?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 251-267.
    5. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Elimination and selection by aspects in health choice experiments: Prioritising health service innovations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 10-22.
    6. Tobias Börger, 2016. "Are Fast Responses More Random? Testing the Effect of Response Time on Scale in an Online Choice Experiment," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 65(2), pages 389-413, October.
    7. Collins, Andrew T. & Rose, John M. & Hensher, David A., 2013. "Specification issues in a generalised random parameters attribute nonattendance model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 234-253.
    8. Fiebig, D.G. & Viney, R. & Haas, M. & Knox, S. & Street, D. & Weisberg, E. & Bateson, D., 2015. "Complexity and doctor choices when discussing contraceptives," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/14, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Addressing elimination and selection by aspects decision rules in discrete choice experiments: does it matter?," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169839, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. Weller, Priska & Oehlmann, Malte & Mariel, Petr & Meyerhoff, Jürgen, 2014. "Stated and inferred attribute non-attendance in a design of designs approach," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 11(C), pages 43-56.

  3. Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise, 2010. "Mixed logit estimation of willingness to pay distributions: a comparison of models in preference and WTP space using data from a health-related choice experiment," Working Papers in Economics 03/10, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Lin, Boqiang & Tan, Ruipeng, 2017. "Are people willing to pay more for new energy bus fares?," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 365-372.
    2. Laura-Lucia Richter & Melvyn Weeks, 2016. "Flexible Mixed Logit with Posterior Analysis: Exploring Willingness-to-Pay for Grid Resilience," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1631, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Meemken, Eva-Marie & Veettil, Prakashan Chellattan & Qaim, Matin, 2017. "Toward Improving the Design of Sustainability Standards—A Gendered Analysis of Farmers’ Preferences," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 285-298.
    4. Penn, Jerrod & Hu, Wuyang, 2016. "Making the Most of Cheap Talk in an Online Survey," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236171, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Giacomo Pallante & Adam Drucker, 2014. "Niche Markets for Agrobiodiversity Conservation: Preference and Scale Heterogeneity Effects on Nepalese Consumers’ WTP for Finger Millet Products," SEEDS Working Papers 1414, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised May 2014.
    6. Riise, Julie & Hole, Arne Risa & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte & Skåtun, Diane, 2015. "GPs’ implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services," Working Papers in Economics 02/15, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    7. Meemken, Eva-Marie & Veettil, Prakashan Chellattan & Qaim, Matin, 2016. "Small farmers’ preferences for the design of certification schemes: Does gender matter?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235473, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Probst, Lorenz & Houedjofonon, Elysée & Ayerakwa, Hayford Mensah & Haas, Rainer, 2012. "Will they buy it? The potential for marketing organic vegetables in the food vending sector to strengthen vegetable safety: A choice experiment study in three West African cities," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 296-308.
    9. Johane Dikgang & Edwin Muchapondwa, 2014. "The economic valuation of nature-based tourism in the South African Kgalagadi area and implications for the Khomani San 'bushmen' community," Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 306-322, November.
    10. Anthony Scott & Julia Lane & John Humphreys & Catherine Joyce & Guyonne Kalb & Sung-Hee Jeon & Matthew McGrail, 2012. "Getting Doctors into the Bush: General Practitioners' Preferences for Rural Location," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n13, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    11. Godager, Geir & Wiesen, Daniel, 2013. "Profit or patients’ health benefit? Exploring the heterogeneity in physician altruism," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1105-1116.
    12. Zhou, Guzhen & Hu, Wuyang & Schieffer, Jack & Robbins, Lynn, 2013. "Public Acceptance of and Willingness to Pay for Nanofood: Case of Canola Oil," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149662, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Dan Pan, 2016. "The Design of Policy Instruments towards Sustainable Livestock Production in China: An Application of the Choice Experiment Method," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(7), pages 1-18, July.
    14. Dissanayake,Sahan T. M. & Beyene,Abebe Damte & Bluffstone,Randall & Gebreegziabher, Zenebe & Martinsson,Peter & Mekonnen,Alemu & Toman,Michael A. & Vieider,Ferdinand M., 2015. "Preferences for REDD+ contract attributes in low-income countries : a choice experiment in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7296, The World Bank.
    15. Zander, Kerstin K. & Signorello, Giovanni & De Salvo, Maria & Gandini, Gustavo & Drucker, Adam G., 2013. "Assessing the total economic value of threatened livestock breeds in Italy: Implications for conservation policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 219-229.
    16. Dikgang, Johane & Muchapondwa, Edwin, "undated". "The Economic Valuation of Dryland Ecosystem Services in the South African Kgalagadi by the Local Communities," Discussion Papers dp-13-15-efd, Resources For the Future.
    17. Ochieng, Dennis O. & Veettil, Prakashan C. & Qaim, Matin, 2017. "Farmers’ preferences for supermarket contracts in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 100-111.
    18. Sauthoff, Saramena & Anastassiadis, Friederike & Mußhoff, Oliver, 2015. "Analyzing farmers' preferences for substrate supply contracts for sugar beets," DARE Discussion Papers 1509, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development (DARE).
    19. Crastes, Romain & Beaumais, Olivier & Arkoun, Ouerdia & Laroutis, Dimitri & Mahieu, Pierre-Alexandre & Rulleau, Bénédicte & Hassani-Taibi, Salima & Barbu, Vladimir Stefan & Gaillard, David, 2014. "Erosive runoff events in the European Union: Using discrete choice experiment to assess the benefits of integrated management policies when preferences are heterogeneous," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 105-112.
    20. Morrissey, Karyn & Plater, Andrew & Dean, Mary, 2018. "The cost of electric power outages in the residential sector: A willingness to pay approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 212(C), pages 141-150.
    21. Vlaeminck, Pieter & Vranken, Liesbet & Van Den Broeck, Goedele & Vande Velde, Katrien & Raymaekers, Karen & Maertens, Miet, 2015. "Farmers’ preferences for Fair Trade contracting in Benin," Working Papers 225931, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    22. Kohei Imamura & Kohei Takenaka Takano & Nobuhito Mori & Tohru Nakashizuka & Shunsuke Managi, 2016. "Attitudes toward disaster-prevention risk in Japanese coastal areas: analysis of civil preference," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 82(1), pages 209-226, May.
    23. Li, Jinhu & Scott, Anthony & McGrail, Matthew & Humphreys, John & Witt, Julia, 2014. "Retaining rural doctors: Doctors' preferences for rural medical workforce incentives," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 56-64.
    24. Liesbet Wetering & Job Exel & Ana Bobinac & Werner Brouwer, 2015. "Valuing QALYs in Relation to Equity Considerations Using a Discrete Choice Experiment," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 33(12), pages 1289-1300, December.
    25. Pallante, Giacomo & Drucker, Adam G. & Sthapit, Sajal, 2016. "Assessing the potential for niche market development to contribute to farmers' livelihoods and agrobiodiversity conservation: Insights from the finger millet case study in Nepal," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 92-105.
    26. Sibiko, Kenneth W. & Veettil, Prakashan C. & Qaim, Matin, 2016. "Small Farmers’ Preferences for Weather Index Insurance: Insights from Kenya," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246399, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    27. Jason M. Bienenfeld & Elizabeth R. Botkins & Brian E. Roe & Marvin T. Batte, 2016. "Country of origin labeling for complex supply chains: the case for labeling the location of different supply chain links," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 47(2), pages 205-213, March.
    28. Balogh, Péter & Békési, Dániel & Gorton, Matthew & Popp, József & Lengyel, Péter, 2016. "Consumer willingness to pay for traditional food products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 176-184.
    29. Völker, Marc & Lienhoop, Nele, 2016. "Exploring group dynamics in deliberative choice experiments," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 57-67.
    30. Daniel A. Brent & Michael Ward, 2017. "Energy Efficiency and Financial Literacy," Departmental Working Papers 2017-04, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    31. Carlsen, Benedicte & Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Norheim, Ole Frithjof, 2012. "When you can’t have the cake and eat it too," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(11), pages 1964-1973.
    32. Sauter, Philipp A. & Möllmann, Torsten B. & Anastassiadis, Friederike & Mußhoff, Oliver & Möhring, Bernhard, 2016. "To insure or not to insure? Analysis of foresters' willingness-to-pay for fire and storm insurance," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 78-89.
    33. Kalkbrenner, Bernhard J. & Yonezawa, Koichi & Roosen, Jutta, 2017. "Consumer preferences for electricity tariffs: Does proximity matter?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 413-424.
    34. Mohammed H. Alemu & Søren B. Olsen, 2017. "Can a Repeated Opt-Out Reminder remove hypothetical bias in discrete choice experiments? An application to consumer valuation of novel food products," IFRO Working Paper 2017/05, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    35. Guzhen Zhou & Wuyang Hu & Wenchao Huang, 2016. "Are Consumers Willing to Pay More for Sustainable Products? A Study of Eco-Labeled Tuna Steak," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(5), pages 1-18, May.
    36. José M. Grisolía & Kenneth G. Willis, 2016. "Consumer choice of theatrical productions: a combined revealed preference–stated preference approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 933-957, May.
    37. Rebecca Owusu Coffie & Michael P. Burton & Fiona L. Gibson & Atakelty Hailu, 2016. "Choice of Rice Production Practices in Ghana: A Comparison of Willingness to Pay and Preference Space Estimates," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(3), pages 799-819, September.

  4. Kolstad, Julie Riise & Lindkvist, Ida, 2010. "Pro-social preferences and self-selection into the public health sector: evidence from economic experiments," Working Papers in Economics 04/10, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Dietrichson, Jens, 2013. "Coordination Incentives, Performance Measurement and Resource Allocation in Public Sector Organizations," Working Papers 2013:26, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    2. Anthony Scott & Peter Sivey, 2017. "Motivation and Competition in Health Care," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2017n05, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Galizzi, Matteo M. & Navarro-Martínez, Daniel, 2018. "On the external validity of social preference games: a systematic lab-field study," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 84088, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Lagarde, Mylène & Blaauw, Duane, 2014. "Pro-social preferences and self-selection into jobs: Evidence from South African nurses," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85229, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. J. Michelle Brock & Andreas Lange & Kenneth L. Leonard, 2016. "Generosity and Prosocial Behavior in Healthcare Provision: Evidence from the Laboratory and Field," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(1), pages 133-162.
    6. David Ong & Chun-Lei Yang, 2014. "Pro Bono Work and Trust in Expert Fields," CESifo Working Paper Series 4897, CESifo Group Munich.

  5. Kolstad, Julie Riise, 2008. "How to make rural jobs more attractive to health workers. Findings from a discrete choice experiment in Tanzania," Working Papers in Economics 15/08, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Vujicic, Marko & Shengelia, Bakhuti & Alfano, Marco & Thu, Ha Bui, 2011. "Physician shortages in rural Vietnam: Using a labor market approach to inform policy," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(7), pages 970-977.
    2. Pedro Ramos & Hélio Alves & Paulo Guimarães & Maria A. Ferreira, 2017. "Junior doctors’ medical specialty and practice location choice: simulating policies to overcome regional inequalities," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(8), pages 1013-1030, November.
    3. Riise, Julie & Hole, Arne Risa & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte & Skåtun, Diane, 2015. "GPs’ implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services," Working Papers in Economics 02/15, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    4. Anthony Scott & Peter Sivey, 2017. "Motivation and Competition in Health Care," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2017n05, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Sonja Fagernäs & Panu Pelkonen, 2012. "Preferences and skills of Indian public sector teachers," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-31, December.
    6. Anthony Scott & Julia Lane & John Humphreys & Catherine Joyce & Guyonne Kalb & Sung-Hee Jeon & Matthew McGrail, 2012. "Getting Doctors into the Bush: General Practitioners' Preferences for Rural Location," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n13, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    7. World Bank & Oxford Policy Management, 2015. "Health Worker Survey in Timor-Leste," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23879, The World Bank.
    8. Godager, Geir & Wiesen, Daniel, 2013. "Profit or patients’ health benefit? Exploring the heterogeneity in physician altruism," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1105-1116.
    9. Sivey, Peter & Scott, Anthony & Witt, Julia & Joyce, Catherine & Humphreys, John, 2012. "Junior doctors’ preferences for specialty choice," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 813-823.
    10. Michael Clark & Domino Determann & Stavros Petrou & Domenico Moro & Esther Bekker-Grob, 2014. "Discrete Choice Experiments in Health Economics: A Review of the Literature," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 32(9), pages 883-902, September.
    11. Leonie Sundmacher & Susanne Ozegowski, 2016. "Regional distribution of physicians: the role of comprehensive private health insurance in Germany," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(4), pages 443-451, May.
    12. Li, Jinhu & Scott, Anthony & McGrail, Matthew & Humphreys, John & Witt, Julia, 2014. "Retaining rural doctors: Doctors' preferences for rural medical workforce incentives," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 56-64.
    13. Ramos, Pedro & Alves, Hélio, 2017. "Migration intentions among Portuguese junior doctors: Results from a survey," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 121(12), pages 1208-1214.
    14. Sonja Fagernäs & Panu Pelkonen, 2011. "Whether to Hire Local Contract Teachers? Trade-off Between Skills and Preferences in India," Working Paper Series 1811, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    15. Carlsen, Benedicte & Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Norheim, Ole Frithjof, 2012. "When you can’t have the cake and eat it too," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(11), pages 1964-1973.

Articles

  1. Line Bjørnskov Pedersen & Julie Riise & Arne Risa Hole & Dorte Gyrd-Hansen, 2014. "GPs' shifting agencies in choice of treatment," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(7), pages 750-761, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Riise, Julie & Hole, Arne Risa & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte & Skåtun, Diane, 2015. "GPs’ implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services," Working Papers in Economics 02/15, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    2. Kaiser, Ulrich & Mendez, Susan J. & Rønde, Thomas, 2010. "Regulation of pharmaceutical prices: Evidence from a reference price reform in Denmark," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-062, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov & Hess, Stephane & Kjær, Trine, 2016. "Asymmetric information and user orientation in general practice: Exploring the agency relationship in a best–worst scaling study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 115-130.
    4. Hafner, Lucas & Reif, Simon & Seebauer, Michael, 2017. "Physician behavior under prospective payment schemes: Evidence from artefactual field and lab experiments," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 18/2017, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    5. Völker, Marc & Lienhoop, Nele, 2016. "Exploring group dynamics in deliberative choice experiments," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 57-67.

  2. Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte, 2013. "Inferred vs. stated attribute non-attendance in choice experiments: A study of doctors’ prescription behaviour," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 21-31.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Arne Hole & Julie Kolstad, 2012. "Mixed logit estimation of willingness to pay distributions: a comparison of models in preference and WTP space using data from a health-related choice experiment," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 445-469, April. See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Carlsen, Benedicte & Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Norheim, Ole Frithjof, 2012. "When you can’t have the cake and eat it too," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(11), pages 1964-1973.

    Cited by:

    1. Riise, Julie & Hole, Arne Risa & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte & Skåtun, Diane, 2015. "GPs’ implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services," Working Papers in Economics 02/15, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    2. Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte, 2013. "Inferred vs. stated attribute non-attendance in choice experiments: A study of doctors’ prescription behaviour," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 21-31.

  5. Julie Riise Kolstad, 2011. "How to make rural jobs more attractive to health workers. Findings from a discrete choice experiment in Tanzania," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 196-211, February. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2011-03-12 2014-07-05 2014-07-13
  2. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (2) 2014-07-05 2014-07-13
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2014-07-05 2014-07-13
  4. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (2) 2014-07-05 2014-07-13
  5. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2011-03-12 2012-05-02
  6. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2011-03-12
  7. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2012-05-02
  8. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2012-05-02
  9. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2011-03-12
  10. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2011-03-12
  11. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2014-07-13
  12. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2014-07-05
  13. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2011-03-12

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