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Denise Donna Hawkes

Personal Details

First Name:Denise
Middle Name:Donna
Last Name:Hawkes
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pha230
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2002 Economics Department; London School of Economics (LSE) (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

UCL Institute of Education, Doctoral School

http://www.ioe.ac.uk/research/departments/351.html
London

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Gabriella Cagliesi & Denise Hawkes & Max Tookey, 2015. "A Multidimensional approach to workless-ness: a matter of opportunities, social factors and individual's idiosyncrasies," DoQSS Working Papers 15-01, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  2. Haskel, Jonathan & Hawkes, Denise & Pereira, Sonia, 2005. "Skills, human capital and the plant productivity gap: UK evidence from matched plant, worker and workforce data," CEPR Discussion Papers 5334, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Dorothe Bonjour & Lynn Cherkas & Jonathan Haskel & Denise Hawkes & Tim Spector, 2002. "Returns to Education: Evidence from UK Twins," CEE Discussion Papers 0022, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.

Articles

  1. Denise Hawkes & Heather Joshi, 2012. "Age at Motherhood and Child Development: Evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 222(1), pages 52-66, October.
  2. Denise Hawkes & Ian Plewis, 2006. "Modelling non-response in the National Child Development Study," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(3), pages 479-491.
  3. Gustavo Crespi & Chiara Criscuolo & Jonathan Haskel & Denise Hawkes, 2006. "Measuring and Understanding Productivity in UK Market Services," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 560-572, Winter.
  4. Dorothe Bonjour & Lynn F. Cherkas & Jonathan E. Haskel & Denise D. Hawkes & Tim D. Spector, 2003. "Returns to Education: Evidence from U.K. Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1799-1812, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Dorothe Bonjour & Lynn F. Cherkas & Jonathan E. Haskel & Denise D. Hawkes & Tim D. Spector, 2003. "Returns to Education: Evidence from U.K. Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1799-1812, December.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Returns to Education: Evidence from U.K. Twins (AER 2003) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Haskel, Jonathan & Hawkes, Denise & Pereira, Sonia, 2005. "Skills, human capital and the plant productivity gap: UK evidence from matched plant, worker and workforce data," CEPR Discussion Papers 5334, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Bartelsman & Sabien Dobbelaere & Bettina Peters, 2013. "Allocation of Human Capital and Innovation at the Frontier: Firm-level Evidence on Germany and the Netherlands," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-095/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Håkanson, Christina & Lindqvist, Erik & Vlachos, Jonas, 2015. "Firms and skills: the evolution of worker sorting," Research Papers in Economics 2015:4, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    3. Mok, Penny & Mason, Geoff & Stevens, Philip & Timmins, Jason, 2012. "A Good Worker is Hard to Find: Skills Shortages in New Zealand Firms," Occasional Papers 12/5, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
    4. Fibla Gasparín, Ma. Teresa, 2010. "Productivity in southern European small firms: When and how work organization complements process innovation," Working Papers 2072/179600, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    5. Susanna Iranzo & Fabiano Schivardi & Elisa Tosetti, 2006. "Skill dispersion and firm productivity; an analysis with employer-employee matched data," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 577, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. S. Iranzo & F. Schivardi & E. Tosetti, 2006. "Skill dispersion and firm productivity: an analysis with employer-employee matched data," Working Paper CRENoS 200617, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    7. Galindo-Rueda, Fernando & Haskel, Jonathan, 2005. "Skills, Workforce Characteristics and Firm-Level Productivity: Evidence from the Matched ABI/Employer Skills Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 1542, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Navon, Guy, 2009. "Human Capital Spillovers in the Workplace: Labor Diversity and Productivity," MPRA Paper 17741, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Rene Söllner, 2010. "Product Diversification and Labor Productivity Dispersion in German Manufacturing Industries," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-028, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    10. Fix, Blair, 2017. "Evidence for a Power Theory of Personal Income Distribution," Working Papers on Capital as Power 2017/03, Capital As Power - Toward a New Cosmology of Capitalism.
    11. Fix, Blair, 2018. "The trouble with human capital theory," Working Papers on Capital as Power 2018/07, Capital As Power - Toward a New Cosmology of Capitalism.
    12. Michèle A. Weynandt, 2014. "Selective Firing and Lemons," NRN working papers 2014-05, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

  2. Dorothe Bonjour & Lynn Cherkas & Jonathan Haskel & Denise Hawkes & Tim Spector, 2002. "Returns to Education: Evidence from UK Twins," CEE Discussion Papers 0022, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Hermannsson, Kristinn & Lecca, Patrizio, 2015. "Human Capital in Economics Development: From Labour Productivity to Macroeconomic Impact," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-53, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    2. Andrew Leigh & Chris Ryan, 2005. "Estimating Returns to Education: Three Natural Experiment Techniques Compared," CEPR Discussion Papers 493, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Mirjam Praag & Arjen van Witteloostuijn & Justin van der Sluis, 2013. "The higher returns to formal education for entrepreneurs versus employees," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 375-396, February.
    4. Sandewall, Örjan & Cesarini, David & Johannesson, Magnus, 2014. "The co-twin methodology and returns to schooling — testing a critical assumption," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 1-10.
    5. Paul Bingley & Kaare Christensen & Ian Walker, 2007. "The Returns to Observable and Unobservable Skills over time: Evidence from a Panel of the Population of Danish Twins," Working Papers 200723, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    6. Holmlund, Helena & Lindahl, Mikael & Plug, Erik, 2010. "The Causal Eff ect of Parent’s Schooling on Children’s Schooling," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2010:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. Helena Holmlund & Mikael Lindahl & Erik Plug, 2011. "The Causal Effect of Parents' Schooling on Children's Schooling: A Comparison of Estimation Methods," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 615-651, September.
    8. Petter Lundborg; & Carl Hampus Lyttkens; & Paul Nystedt;, 2012. "Human capital and longevity. Evidence from 50,000 twins," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/19, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Ming-Jen Lin & Jin-Tan Liu & Shin-Yi Chou, 2007. "As Low Birth Weight Babies Grow, Can 'Good' Parents Buffer this Adverse Factor? A Research Note," NBER Working Papers 12857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Dickson, Matt, 2009. "The Causal Effect of Education on Wages Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 4419, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Mirjam van Praag & Arjen van Witteloostuijn & Justin van der Sluis, 2009. "Returns for Entrepreneurs versus Employees: The Effect of Education and Personal Control on the Relative Performance of Entrepreneurs vis-a-vis Wage Employees," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-111/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    12. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2006. "The return to schooling: Estimates from a sample of young Australian twins," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 571-587, October.
    13. Alexander Muravyev, 2007. "Firm Size, Wages and Unobserved Skills: Evidence from Dual Job Holdings in the UK," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 681, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    14. Andrew Leigh, 2008. "Returns To Education In Australia," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 27(3), pages 233-249, September.
    15. Alain-Désiré Nimubona & Désiré Vencatachellum, 2007. "Intergenerational education mobility of black and white South Africans," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(1), pages 149-182, February.
    16. Hyytinen, Ari & Ilmakunnas, Pekka & Toivanen, Otto, 2013. "The return-to-entrepreneurship puzzle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 57-67.
    17. Al-Samarrai, Samer & Reilly, Barry, 2006. "Education, Employment and Earnings of Secondary School and University Leavers in Tanzania: Evidence from a Tracer Study," MPRA Paper 129, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Petter Lundborg, 2013. "The health returns to schooling—what can we learn from twins?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 673-701, April.
    19. Leyla Mocan, 2014. "The Impact of Education on Wages: Analysis of an Education Reform in Turkey," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1424, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    20. Ming-Jen Lin & Jin-Tan Liu & Shin-Yi Chou, 2007. "As low birth weight babies grow, can well-educated parents buffer this adverse factor? A research note," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(2), pages 335-343, May.
    21. Makiko Nakamuro & Tomohiko Inui & Shinji Yamagata, 2017. "Returns to Education Using a Sample of Twins: Evidence from Japan-super-," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 31(1), pages 61-81, March.
    22. Gianni De Fraja, 2004. "Education and Redistribution," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 94(3), pages 3-44, May-June.
    23. Alexander Muravyev, 2009. "Employer Size, Wages And Unobserved Skills: Evidence From Moonlighters In The Uk," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 77(6), pages 651-674, December.
    24. Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Lundborg, Petter & Lyttkens, Carl Hampus & Nystedt, Paul, 2012. "Do Socioeconomic Factors Really Explain Income-Related Inequalities in Health? Applying a Twin Design to Standard Decomposition Analysis," Working Papers 2012:21, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    25. Hongbin Li & Pak Wai Liu & Ning Ma & Junsen Zhang, 2005. "Does Education Pay in Urban China? Estimating Returns to Education Using Twins," Discussion Papers 00013, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
    26. Amin, Vikesh & Behrman, Jere R. & Spector, Tim D., 2013. "Does more schooling improve health outcomes and health related behaviors? Evidence from U.K. twins," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 134-148.
    27. Webbink, Dinand & Martin, Nicholas G. & Visscher, Peter M., 2010. "Does education reduce the probability of being overweight?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 29-38, January.
    28. Alejos, Luis Alejandro, 2006. "La elección del sector laboral y los retornos a la educación en Guatemala
      [Labour Sector Choice and the Returns to Education in Guatemala]
      ," MPRA Paper 42756, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    29. Lundborg, Petter & Nilsson, Anton & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2011. "Does Early Life Health Predict Schooling Within Twin Pairs?," IZA Discussion Papers 5803, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    30. Petter Lundborg & Carl Hampus Lyttkens & Paul Nystedt, 2016. "The Effect of Schooling on Mortality: New Evidence From 50,000 Swedish Twins," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(4), pages 1135-1168, August.
    31. Lång, Elisabeth & Nystedt, Paul, 2016. "Learning For Life? The Effects of Schooling on Earnings and Health- Related Behavior Over the Life Cycle," LiU Working Papers in Economics 4, Linköping University, Division of Economics, Department of Management and Engineering.
    32. Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W. & Slutske, Wendy S. & Martin, Nicholas G., 2010. "Are Attitudes Towards Economic Risk Heritable? Analyses Using the Australian Twin Study of Gambling," IZA Discussion Papers 4859, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    33. Li, Hongbin & Liu, Pak Wai & Zhang, Junsen, 2012. "Estimating returns to education using twins in urban China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 494-504.
    34. Kristinn Hermannsson & Patrizio Lecca, 2014. "Human capital investment and population growth: An overlapping generations analysis for Malawi," EcoMod2014 6823, EcoMod.
    35. Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & Vibeke Jensen & Dorthe Pedersen & Inge Petersen & Paul Bingley & Kaare Christensen, 2011. "Does More Schooling Reduce Hospitalization and Delay Mortality? New Evidence Based on Danish Twins," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(4), pages 1347-1375, November.
    36. Petter Lundborg, 0000. "The Health Returns to Education - What can we learn from Twins?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-027/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    37. van Praag, Mirjam C. & van Witteloostuijn, Arjen & van der Sluis, Justin, 2009. "Returns for Entrepreneurs vs. Employees: The Effect of Education and Personal Control on the Relative Performance of Entrepreneurs vs. Wage Employees," IZA Discussion Papers 4628, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    38. Petter Lundborg & Anton Nilsson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2016. "The health-schooling relationship: evidence from Swedish twins," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 1191-1215, October.
    39. Zhang, Junsen & Liu, Pak-Wai & Yung, Linda, 2007. "The Cultural Revolution and returns to schooling in China: Estimates based on twins," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 631-639, November.
    40. NAKAMURO Makiko & INUI Tomohiko, 2012. "Estimating the Returns to Education Using a Sample of Twins - The case of Japan -," Discussion papers 12076, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

Articles

  1. Denise Hawkes & Heather Joshi, 2012. "Age at Motherhood and Child Development: Evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 222(1), pages 52-66, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Dickerson & Gurleen K. Popli, 2016. "Persistent poverty and children's cognitive development: evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort Study," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 179(2), pages 535-558, February.
    2. Mónica Hernández-Alava & Gurleen Popli, 2017. "Children’s Development and Parental Input: Evidence From the UK Millennium Cohort Study," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 485-511, April.
    3. Jaimee Stuart & Gail Pacheco & Mary Hedges & Susan Morton, 2013. "Monkey see, monkey do? How do shifts in parental socio-economic class influence children's outcomes?," Working Papers 2013-07, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.

  2. Denise Hawkes & Ian Plewis, 2006. "Modelling non-response in the National Child Development Study," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(3), pages 479-491.

    Cited by:

    1. Emanuele Millemaci & Dario Sciulli, 2011. "The causal effect of family difficulties during childhood on adult labour market outcomes," CEIS Research Paper 203, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 30 Jun 2011.
    2. Kevin Denny & Orla Doyle, 2005. "Does voting history matter : analysing persistence in turnout," Open Access publications 10197/167, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Orla Doyle & Kevin Denny, 2010. "The causal effect of breastfeeding on children's cognitive development: A quasi-experimental design," Working Papers 201020, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    4. Schnepf, Sylke V. & Durrant, Gabriele B. & Micklewright, John, 2014. "Which Schools and Pupils Respond to Educational Achievement Surveys? A Focus on the English PISA Sample," IZA Discussion Papers 8411, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Emanuele Millemaci & Dario Sciulli, 2014. "The long-term impact of family difficulties during childhood on labor market outcomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 663-687, December.
    6. Palloni, Alberto & Milesi, Carolina & White, Robert G. & Turner, Alyn, 2009. "Early childhood health, reproduction of economic inequalities and the persistence of health and mortality differentials," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(9), pages 1574-1582, May.
    7. Sciulli, Dario, 2016. "Adult employment probabilities of socially maladjusted children," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 9-22.
    8. Brown, Sarah & Ortiz-Nuñez, Aurora & Taylor, Karl, 2011. "What will I be when I grow up? An analysis of childhood expectations and career outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 493-506, June.
    9. Uhrig, S.C. Noah, 2008. "The nature and causes of attrition in the British Household Panel Study," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    10. Gabriella Melis & Mark Elliot & Nick Shryane, 2014. "Environmental Concern Over Time: Evidence from the Longitudinal Analysis of a British Cohort Study from 1991 to 2008," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 95(4), pages 905-919, December.
    11. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2008. "Bullying, education and earnings: Evidence from the National Child Development Study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 387-401, August.
    12. Fiona Steele & Constantinos Kallis & Harvey Goldstein & Heather Joshi, 2005. "The relationship between childbearing and transitions from marriage and cohabitation in Britain," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 647-673, November.
    13. Joachim R. Frick & Markus M. Grabka, 2007. "Item Non-response and Imputation of Annual Labor Income in Panel Surveys from a Cross-National Perspective," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 736, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    14. Nicole Watson & Mark Wooden, 2011. "Re-engaging with Survey Non-respondents: The BHPS, SOEP and HILDA Survey Experience," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 379, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    15. Egan, Mark & Daly, Michael & Delaney, Liam, 2015. "Childhood psychological distress and youth unemployment: Evidence from two British cohort studies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 11-17.
    16. Christian Seiler, 2010. "Dynamic Modelling of Nonresponse in Business Surveys," ifo Working Paper Series 93, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    17. Chen, Alice J., 2012. "When does weight matter most?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 285-295.
    18. Stefan Kipar, 2012. "Determinants of Firm Innovation - Evidence from German Panel Data," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 45, January.
    19. Tobias Gramlich, 2008. "Analyse der Panelausfälle im Sozio-oekonomischen Panel SOEP," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 129, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    20. John Strauss & Duncan Thomas & Firman Witoelar & Elizabeth Frankenberg & Bondan Sikoki & Cecep Sumantri & Wayan Suriastini, 2010. "Cutting the costs of attrition: Results from the Indonesia Family Life Survey," Working Papers id:2652, eSocialSciences.
    21. Christopher J. Gerry & Georgios Papadopoulos, 2015. "Sample attrition in the RLMS, 2001–10," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 425-468, April.
    22. Daly, M. & Delaney, L., 2013. "The scarring effect of unemployment throughout adulthood on psychological distress at age 50: Estimates controlling for early adulthood distress and childhood psychological factors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 19-23.
    23. Steele, Fiona & Durrant, Gabriele B., 2011. "Alternative approaches to multilevel modelling of survey non-contact and refusal," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 50113, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    24. Andrew Burke & Felix FitzRoy & Michael Nolan, 2008. "What makes a die-hard entrepreneur? Beyond the ‘employee or entrepreneur’ dichotomy," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 93-115, August.

  3. Gustavo Crespi & Chiara Criscuolo & Jonathan Haskel & Denise Hawkes, 2006. "Measuring and Understanding Productivity in UK Market Services," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 560-572, Winter.

    Cited by:

    1. Valentina Meliciani & Maria Savona, 2015. "The determinants of regional specialisation in business services: agglomeration economies, vertical linkages and innovation," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 387-416.
    2. Arias Ortiz E. & Crespi, G. & Rasteletti, A. & Vargas, F., 2014. "Productivity in services in Latin America and the Caribbean," MERIT Working Papers 056, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Fernandes, Ana M., 2007. "Structure and performance of the services sector in transition economies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4357, The World Bank.
    4. Bogliacino, Francesco & Pianta, Mario, 2011. "Engines of growth. Innovation and productivity in industry groups," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 41-53, February.
    5. Peer-Olaf Siebers & Uwe Aickelin, 2011. "A First Approach on Modelling Staff Proactiveness in Retail Simulation Models," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 14(2), pages 1-2.
    6. Bassanini, Andrea & Nunziata, Luca & Venn, Danielle, 2008. "Job Protection Legislation and Productivity Growth in OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 3555, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Pål Børing, 2014. "The Impact Of Manufacturing Firms’ Use Of Academic Workers On Their Productivity Level," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(2), pages 156-172, April.
    8. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2012. "The Transatlantic Productivity Gap: A Survey Of The Main Causes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 395-419, July.
    9. Harchaoui, Tarek M., 2012. "A Quarter of a Century Progress Report on the Services Sector Productivity Statistics. A Europe-United States Perspective," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-125, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
    10. Marcel Canoy & Peter Smith, 2008. "Services and the Single Market," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 319-347, December.
    11. Robert Inklaar & Marcel P. Timmer & Bart van Ark, 2008. "Data for Productivity Measurement in Market Services: An International Comparison," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 16, pages 72-81, Spring.
    12. Mario D. Tello, 2013. "Science, Technology and Innovation in Peru 2000-2012: The Case of Services," Documentos de Trabajo / Working Papers 2013-353, Departamento de Economía - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
    13. Andrés Maroto-Sanchez, 2010. "Growth and productivity in the service sector: The state of the art," Working Papers 07/10, Instituto Universitario de Análisis Económico y Social.
    14. Rinaldo Evangelista & Maria Savona, 2010. "Innovation and Employment in Services," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Innovation and Services, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.

  4. Dorothe Bonjour & Lynn F. Cherkas & Jonathan E. Haskel & Denise D. Hawkes & Tim D. Spector, 2003. "Returns to Education: Evidence from U.K. Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1799-1812, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2002-03-14 2003-02-18 2003-10-28
  2. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2005-12-09
  3. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2005-12-09
  4. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2015-04-02
  5. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2005-12-09
  6. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2005-12-09

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