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Ginny Seung Choi

Personal Details

First Name:Ginny Seung
Middle Name:
Last Name:Choi
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch1179
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree: Economics Department; George Mason University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Mercatus Center
George Mason University

Arlington, Virginia (United States)
http://www.mercatus.org/
RePEc:edi:mcgmuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. James Habyarimana & Daniel Houser & Stuti Khemani & Viktor Brech & Ginny Seung Choi & Moumita Roy, 2021. "Clientelism and identity," Economic and Political Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(1), pages 113-133, January.
  2. Ginny Seung Choi & Virgil Henry Storr, 2020. "Market interactions, trust and reciprocity," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(5), pages 1-32, May.
  3. Seung Ginny Choi & Virgil Henry Storr, 2019. "A culture of rent seeking," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 181(1), pages 101-126, October.
  4. Ginny Seung Choi & Virgil Henry Storr, 2018. "Market institutions and the evolution of culture," Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 243-265, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Ginny Seung Choi & Virgil Henry Storr, 2020. "Market interactions, trust and reciprocity," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(5), pages 1-32, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Christoph Huber & Anna Dreber & Jürgen Huber & Magnus Johannesson & Michael Kirchler & Utz Weitzel & Miguel Abellán & Xeniya Adayeva & Fehime Ceren Ay & Kai Barron & Zachariah Berry & Werner Bönte , 2023. "Competition and moral behavior: A meta-analysis of forty-five crowd-sourced experimental designs," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 120(23), pages 2215572120-, June.

  2. Seung Ginny Choi & Virgil Henry Storr, 2019. "A culture of rent seeking," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 181(1), pages 101-126, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Samuel Brazys & Krishna Chaitanya Vadlamannati, 2021. "Aid curse with Chinese characteristics? Chinese development flows and economic reforms," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 188(3), pages 407-430, September.
    2. Andrew Smith & Graham Brownlow, 2023. "Informal Institutions as Inhibitors of Rent-Seeking Entrepreneurship: Evidence From U.S. Legal History," Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, , vol. 47(6), pages 2323-2346, November.
    3. DuckKi Cho & Lyungmae Choi & Jessie Jiaxu Wang, 2023. "It's Not Who You Know—It's Who Knows You: Employee Social Capital and Firm Performance," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2023-020, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Antony W. Dnes & Raymond Swaray, 2020. "Criminalizing price‐fixing," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 41(8), pages 1417-1430, December.
    5. Petr Wawrosz, 2022. "How Corruption Is and Should Be Investigated by Economic Theory," Economies, MDPI, vol. 10(12), pages 1-23, December.
    6. Victor I. Espinosa & José Antonio Peña-Ramos & Fátima Recuero-López, 2021. "The Political Economy of Rent-Seeking: Evidence from Spain’s Support Policies for Renewable Energy," Energies, MDPI, vol. 14(14), pages 1-16, July.
    7. Julio A. Ramos Pastrana, 2021. "Who’s getting the office? Party dominance and elected executives’ career path," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 74(2), pages 270-297, May.
    8. Alice Guerra & Tatyana Zhuravleva, 2022. "Do women always behave as corruption cleaners?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 191(1), pages 173-192, April.
    9. Niklas Elert & Magnus Henrekson, 2021. "Entrepreneurship prompts institutional change in developing economies," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 34(1), pages 33-53, March.
    10. Liu, Lu & Zhao, Qiuhong & Bi, Yanlin, 2020. "Why rent-seeking behavior may exist in Chinese mining safety production inspection system and how to alleviate it: A tripartite game analysis," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C).
    11. Jordan Karl Lofthouse, 2019. "Culture and Native American economic development," Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 9(1), pages 21-39, November.
    12. Armando Razo, 2021. "Network structure and performance of crony capitalism systems credible commitments without democratic institutions," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 189(1), pages 115-137, October.
    13. Virgil Henry Storr & Stefanie Haeffele & Jordan K. Lofthouse & Anne Hobson, 2022. "Entrepreneurship during a pandemic," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 54(1), pages 83-105, August.
    14. Mark Pennington, 2023. "Foucault and Hayek on public health and the road to serfdom," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 195(1), pages 125-143, April.
    15. Ciccia, Diego & Distefano, Rosaria & Reito, Francesco, 2022. "The mismatch between potential and actual shirking in a model of bureaucracy," MPRA Paper 115452, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Cai, Meina & Caskey, Gregory W. & Cowen, Nick & Murtazashvili, Ilia & Murtazashvili, Jennifer Brick & Salahodjaev, Raufhon, 2022. "Individualism, economic freedom, and charitable giving," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 200(C), pages 868-884.
    17. Ružica Šimić Banović, 2019. "Uhljeb – a post-socialist homo croaticus: a personification of the economy of favours in Croatia?," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 279-300, May.
    18. Matthew D. Mitchell, 2019. "Uncontestable favoritism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 181(1), pages 167-190, October.
    19. Philip C. Solimine & R. Mark Isaac, 2021. "Reputation and Market Structure in Experimental Platforms," Working Papers wp2021_08_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    20. Boettke, Peter J. & Candela, Rosolino A. & Zhukov, Konstantin, 2023. "The morality of illicit markets: “Greasing the wheels” or “greasing the palm”?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 209(C), pages 411-422.

  3. Ginny Seung Choi & Virgil Henry Storr, 2018. "Market institutions and the evolution of culture," Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 243-265, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Dan & Meagher, Kieron J. & Wait, Andrew, 2022. "Market conditions and firm morality: Employee trust in the honesty of their managers," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 204(C), pages 89-106.
    2. Sandye Gloria, 2019. "From Methodological Individualism to Complexity: The Case of Ludwig Lachmann," Post-Print halshs-02345495, HAL.
    3. Sandye Gloria, 2019. "From Methodological Individualism to Complexity: The Case of Ludwig Lachmann," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 216-232, April.

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