IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pbo467.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Jonathan Boymal

Personal Details

First Name:Jonathan
Middle Name:
Last Name:Boymal
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbo467
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:1999 Department of Economics; Monash Business School; Monash University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

School of Economics, Finance and Marketing
RMIT University

Melbourne, Australia
https://www.rmit.edu.au/about/schools-colleges/economics-finance-and-marketing
RePEc:edi:dermiau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sinclair, Sarah & Boymal, Jonathan & de Silva, Ashton, 2010. "A re-appraisal of the fertility response to the Australian baby bonus," MPRA Paper 27580, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Rogers, Patricia J. & Stevens, Kaye & Boymal, Jonathan, 2009. "Qualitative cost-benefit evaluation of complex, emergent programs," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 83-90, February.
  2. Boymal, Jonathan, 2003. "Addiction and intrapersonal externalities in the labour market," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 657-672.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Sinclair, Sarah & Boymal, Jonathan & de Silva, Ashton, 2010. "A re-appraisal of the fertility response to the Australian baby bonus," MPRA Paper 27580, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Jerome Adda & Christian Dustmann & Katrien Stevens, 2012. "The Career Costs of Children," Economics Working Papers ECO2012/, European University Institute.
    2. Suzanne Bonner & Dipanwita Sarkar, 2020. "Who responds to fertility-boosting incentives? Evidence from pro-natal policies in Australia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 42(18), pages 513-548.
    3. Magdalena Smyk & Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas van der Velde, 2021. "A Cautionary Note on the Reliability of the Online Survey Data: The Case of Wage Indicator," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 50(1), pages 429-464, February.
    4. Fan Elliott & Maitra Pushkar, 2013. "Women Rule: Preferences and Fertility in Australian Households," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-30, April.
    5. Krzysztof Makarski & Joanna Tyrowicz & Magda Malec, 2019. "Evaluating welfare and economic effects of raised fertility," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201902, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    6. Neil, Amanda L. & Chappell, Kate & Wagg, Fiona & Miller, April & Judd, Fiona, 2021. "The Tasmanian Conception to Community (C2C) Study Database 2008-09 to 2013-14: Using linked health administrative data to address each piece in the puzzle," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 284(C).
    7. de Gendre, Alexandra & Lynch, John & Meunier, Aurélie & Pilkington, Rhiannon & Schurer, Stefanie, 2021. "Child Health and Parental Responses to an Unconditional Cash Transfer at Birth," IZA Discussion Papers 14693, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Mengni Chen & Chris J Lloyd & Paul S F Yip, 2018. "A new method of identifying target groups for pronatalist policy applied to Australia," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(2), pages 1-13, February.
    9. Gaitz, Jason & Schurer, Stefanie, 2017. "Bonus Skills: Examining the Effect of an Unconditional Cash Transfer on Child Human Capital Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 10525, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Sinclair, Sarah & Boymal, Jonathan & de Silva, Ashton J, 2012. "Is the fertility response to the Australian baby bonus heterogeneous across maternal age? Evidence from Victoria," MPRA Paper 42725, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Rogers, Patricia J. & Stevens, Kaye & Boymal, Jonathan, 2009. "Qualitative cost-benefit evaluation of complex, emergent programs," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 83-90, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Marcin Połom & Maciej Tarkowski & Krystian Puzdrakiewicz & Łukasz Dopierała, 2020. "Is It Possible to Develop Electromobility in Urban Passenger Shipping in Post-Communist Countries? Evidence from Gdańsk, Poland," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(23), pages 1-24, December.
    2. Mihic, Marko M. & Todorovic, Marija Lj. & Obradovic, Vladimir Lj., 2014. "Economic analysis of social services for the elderly in Serbia: Two sides of the same coin," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 9-21.
    3. Alexei Botchkarev, 2016. "Essential notion of the health economic evaluation: Definition," Economic Analysis Working Papers (2002-2010). Atlantic Review of Economics (2011-2016), Colexio de Economistas de A Coruña, Spain and Fundación Una Galicia Moderna, vol. 2, pages 1-1, December.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Jonathan Boymal should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.