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Andrew Barr

Personal Details

First Name:Andrew
Middle Name:
Last Name:Barr
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba1489
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Texas A&M University

College Station, Texas (United States)
http://econweb.tamu.edu/

: (409)845-7351
(409)847-8757
Academic Building - West (Bush Complex) Room 3035, College Station, TX 77843-4228
RePEc:edi:detamus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Andrew Barr & Sarah Turner, 2017. "A Letter and Encouragement: Does Information Increase Post-Secondary Enrollment of UI Recipients?," NBER Working Papers 23374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Andrew Barr & Sarah E. Turner, 2014. "Out of Work and Into School: Labor Market Policies and College Enrollment During the Great Recession," CESifo Working Paper Series 4732, CESifo Group Munich.

Articles

  1. Barr, Andrew, 2016. "Enlist or enroll: Credit constraints, college aid, and the military enlistment margin," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 61-78.
  2. Andrew C. Barr & Thomas S. Dee, 2016. "Property Taxes and Politicians: Evidence From School Budget Elections," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 69(3), pages 517-544, September.
  3. Andrew Barr, 2015. "From the Battlefield to the Schoolyard: The Short- Term Impact of the Post- 9/11 GI Bill," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 580-613.
  4. Barr, Andrew & Turner, Sarah, 2015. "Out of work and into school: Labor market policies and college enrollment during the Great Recession," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 63-73.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Andrew Barr & Sarah E. Turner, 2014. "Out of Work and Into School: Labor Market Policies and College Enrollment During the Great Recession," CESifo Working Paper Series 4732, CESifo Group Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Brad Hershbein & Lisa B. Kahn, 2016. "Do Recessions Accelerate Routine-Biased Technological Change? Evidence from Vacancy Postings," NBER Working Papers 22762, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Benjamin M. Marx & Lesley J. Turner, 2017. "Student Loan Nudges: Experimental Evidence on Borrowing and Educational Attainment," NBER Working Papers 24060, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Elizabeth B. Clelan & Michael S. Kofoed, 2017. "The Effect Of The Business Cycle On Freshman Financial Aid," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 253-268, April.
    4. Andrew Christopher Barr & Sarah E. Turner, 2017. "A Letter and Encouragement: Does Information Increase Post-Secondary Enrollment of UI Recipients?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6459, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Alexandr Kopytov & Nikolai Roussanov & Mathieu Taschereau-Dumouchel, 2018. "Short-Run Pain, Long-Run Gain? Recessions and Technological Transformation," NBER Working Papers 24373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Patrick Denice, 2017. "Back to School: Racial and Gender Differences in Adults’ Participation in Formal Schooling, 1978–2013," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(3), pages 1147-1173, June.
    7. Ayako Kondo, 2015. "Differential effects of graduating during a recession across gender and race," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, December.
    8. Adam Looney & Constantine Yannelis, 2015. "A Crisis in Student Loans? How Changes in the Characteristics of Borrowers and in the Institutions They Attended Contributed to Rising Loan Defaults," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(2 (Fall)), pages 1-89.
    9. Holger M. Mueller & Constantine Yannelis, 2017. "Students in Distress: Labor Market Shocks, Student Loan Default, and Federal Insurance Programs," NBER Working Papers 23284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Mueller, Holger M & Yannelis, Constantine, 2017. "Students in Distress: Labor Market Shocks, Student Loan Default, and Federal Insurance Programs," CEPR Discussion Papers 11938, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

Articles

  1. Barr, Andrew, 2016. "Enlist or enroll: Credit constraints, college aid, and the military enlistment margin," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 61-78.

    Cited by:

    1. Torun, Huzeyfe & Tumen, Semih, 2016. "The effects of compulsory military service exemption on education and labor market outcomes: Evidence from a natural experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 16-35.
    2. Andrew Barr, 2015. "From the Battlefield to the Schoolyard: The Short- Term Impact of the Post- 9/11 GI Bill," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 580-613.

  2. Andrew Barr, 2015. "From the Battlefield to the Schoolyard: The Short- Term Impact of the Post- 9/11 GI Bill," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 580-613.

    Cited by:

    1. Torun, Huzeyfe & Tumen, Semih, 2016. "The effects of compulsory military service exemption on education and labor market outcomes: Evidence from a natural experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 16-35.
    2. Andrew Christopher Barr & Sarah E. Turner, 2017. "A Letter and Encouragement: Does Information Increase Post-Secondary Enrollment of UI Recipients?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6459, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Armona, Luis & Chakrabarti, Rajashri & Lovenheim, Michael, 2017. "How does for-profit college attendance affect student loans, defaults, and labor market outcomes?," Staff Reports 811, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Apr 2018.
    4. Barr, Andrew, 2016. "Enlist or enroll: Credit constraints, college aid, and the military enlistment margin," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 61-78.

  3. Barr, Andrew & Turner, Sarah, 2015. "Out of work and into school: Labor market policies and college enrollment during the Great Recession," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 63-73. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2017-05-21. Author is listed

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