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Paul S. Nelson

Personal Details

First Name:Paul
Middle Name:S.
Last Name:Nelson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pne156
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Accounting
University of Louisiana

Monroe, Louisiana (United States)
https://www.ulm.edu/cbss/accounting/

(318) 342-1150

700 University Avenue, Monroe, LA 71209
RePEc:edi:deulmus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Paul W. Grimes & Paul S. Nelson, 1995. "The Social Issues Pedagogy vs. the Traditional Principles of Economics: An Empirical Examination," GE, Growth, Math methods 9510001, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. John L. Scott & Paul S. Nelson, 2007. "Voting with a Hand on the Bible and Not on the Wallet: The 1996 Video Poker Referendum in Louisiana," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 571-591, July.
  2. Holcomb, James H. & Nelson, Paul S., 1997. "The role of monitoring in duopoly market outcomes," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 79-93.
  3. Holcomb, James H. & Nelson, Paul S., 1991. "Cartel failure: A mistake or do they do it to each other on purpose?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 235-249.
  4. Nelson, Paul S., 1988. "Rational expectations in experimental duopoly markets," Journal of Behavioral Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 195-206.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Paul W. Grimes & Paul S. Nelson, 1995. "The Social Issues Pedagogy vs. the Traditional Principles of Economics: An Empirical Examination," GE, Growth, Math methods 9510001, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Geoffrey Schneider, 2011. "The Purpose, Structure and Content of the Principles of Economics Course," Chapters, in: Gail M. Hoyt & KimMarie McGoldrick (ed.), International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 27, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Steven Dickey & Robert Houston Jr., 2009. "Disaggregating Education Production," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(2), pages 135-144, June.
    3. Carlos J. Asarta & Austin S. Jennings & Paul W. Grimes, 2017. "Economic Education Retrospective," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 62(1), pages 102-117, March.

Articles

  1. Holcomb, James H. & Nelson, Paul S., 1997. "The role of monitoring in duopoly market outcomes," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 79-93.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Kloosterman, 2020. "Cooperation in stochastic games: a prisoner’s dilemma experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 23(2), pages 447-467, June.
    2. Waichman, Israel & Requate, Till & Siang, Ch'ng Kean, 2010. "Pre-play communication in Cournot competition: An experiment with students and managers," Economics Working Papers 2010-09, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    3. Maria Bigoni & Jan Potters & Giancarlo Spagnolo, 2019. "Frequency of interaction, communication and collusion: an experiment," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 68(4), pages 827-844, November.
    4. Alexia Gaudeul & Paolo Crosetto & Gerhard Riener, 2015. "Of the stability of partnerships when individuals have outside options, or why allowing exit is inefficient," Jena Economic Research Papers 2015-001, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    5. Goeschl, Timo & Jarke, Johannes, 2017. "Trust, but verify? Monitoring, inspection costs, and opportunism under limited observability," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 320-330.
    6. Alexia Gaudeul & Paolo Crosetto & Gerhard Riener, 2014. "Fear of being left alone drives inefficient exit from partnerships. An experiment," Jena Economic Research Papers 2014-012, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    7. Masaki Aoyagi & V. Bhaskar & Guillaume R. Frechette, 2015. "The Impact of Monitoring in Infinitely Repeated Games: Perfect, Public, and Private," ISER Discussion Paper 0942, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    8. Masaki Aoyagi & Guillaume R. Frechette, 2004. "Collusion in Repeated Games with Imperfect Public Monitoring," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000000127, UCLA Department of Economics.
    9. Bigoni, Maria & Potters, Jan & Spagnolo, Giancarlo, 2012. "Flexibility and Collusion with Imperfect Monitoring," CEPR Discussion Papers 8877, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Aoyagi, Masaki & Fréchette, Guillaume, 2009. "Collusion as public monitoring becomes noisy: Experimental evidence," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 144(3), pages 1135-1165, May.
    11. John A. List, 2009. "The Economics of Open Air Markets," NBER Working Papers 15420, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Hitoshi Matsushima & Tomohisa Toyama, 2011. "Monitoring Accuracy and Retaliation in Infinitely Repeated Games with Imperfect Private Monitoring: Theory and Experiments," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-795, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

  2. Holcomb, James H. & Nelson, Paul S., 1991. "Cartel failure: A mistake or do they do it to each other on purpose?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 235-249.

    Cited by:

    1. Holcomb, James H. & Nelson, Paul S., 1997. "The role of monitoring in duopoly market outcomes," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 79-93.

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