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Stephen Obeng Gyimah

Personal Details

This person is deceased (Date: 11 May 2012)
First Name:Stephen
Middle Name:Obeng
Last Name:Gyimah
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgy8
http://stevegyimah.com

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Stephen Gyimah & Alex Ezeh & J. Fotso, 2012. "Frailty models with applications to the study of infant deaths on birth timing in Ghana and Kenya," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 46(5), pages 1505-1521, August.
  2. Gyimah, Stephen Obeng, 2009. "Polygynous marital structure and child survivorship in sub-Saharan Africa: Some empirical evidence from Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 334-342, January.
  3. Stephen Gyimah, 2009. "Cohort Differences in Women’s Educational Attainment and the Transition to First Marriage in Ghana," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(4), pages 455-471, August.
  4. Gyimah, Stephen Obeng & Takyi, Baffour K. & Addai, Isaac, 2006. "Challenges to the reproductive-health needs of African women: On religion and maternal health utilization in Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(12), pages 2930-2944, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Gyimah, Stephen Obeng, 2009. "Polygynous marital structure and child survivorship in sub-Saharan Africa: Some empirical evidence from Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 334-342, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Barr, Abigail & Dekker, Marleen & Janssens, Wendy & Kebede, Bereket & Kramer, Berber, 2017. "Cooperation in polygynous households," IFPRI discussion papers 1625, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Shelley Clark & Dana Hamplová, 2013. "Single Motherhood and Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Life Course Perspective," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(5), pages 1521-1549, October.
    3. Lépine, Aurélia & Strobl, Eric, 2013. "The Effect of Women’s Bargaining Power on Child Nutrition in Rural Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 17-30.
    4. Bove, Riley M. & Vala-Haynes, Emily & Valeggia, Claudia R., 2012. "Women's health in urban Mali: Social predictors and health itineraries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1392-1399.
    5. Edlund, Lena & Ku, Hyejin, 2011. "The African Slave Trade and the Curious Case of General Polygyny," MPRA Paper 52735, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 16 Dec 2013.
    6. Emily Smith-Greenaway & Jenny Trinitapoli, 2014. "Polygynous Contexts, Family Structure, and Infant Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 341-366, April.

  2. Stephen Gyimah, 2009. "Cohort Differences in Women’s Educational Attainment and the Transition to First Marriage in Ghana," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(4), pages 455-471, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Anukriti, S & Dasgupta, Shatanjaya, 2017. "Marriage Markets in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 10556, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Rhiannon Kroeger & Reanne Frank & Kammi Schmeer, 2015. "Educational Attainment and Timing to First Union Across Three Generations of Mexican Women," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(3), pages 417-435, June.
    3. Felicia Tian, 2013. "Transition to First Marriage in Reform-Era Urban China: The Persistent Effect of Education in a Period of Rapid Social Change," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(4), pages 529-552, August.

  3. Gyimah, Stephen Obeng & Takyi, Baffour K. & Addai, Isaac, 2006. "Challenges to the reproductive-health needs of African women: On religion and maternal health utilization in Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(12), pages 2930-2944, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Vincent Z. Kuuire & Eric Y. Tenkorang & Andrea Rishworth & Isaac Luginaah & Alfred E. Yawson, 2017. "Is the Pro-Poor Premium Exemption Policy of Ghana’s NHIS Reducing Disparities Among the Elderly?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(2), pages 231-249, April.
    2. Dixon, Jenna & Luginaah, Isaac & Mkandawire, Paul, 2014. "The National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana's Upper West Region: A gendered perspective of insurance acquisition in a resource-poor setting," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 103-112.
    3. Ha, Wei & Salama, Peter & Gwavuya, Stanley & Kanjala, Chifundo, 2014. "Is religion the forgotten variable in maternal and child health? Evidence from Zimbabwe," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 80-88.
    4. Trani, Jean-Francois & Browne, Joyce & Kett, Maria & Bah, Osman & Morlai, Teddy & Bailey, Nicki & Groce, Nora, 2011. "Access to health care, reproductive health and disability: A large scale survey in Sierra Leone," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(10), pages 1477-1489.
    5. McTavish, Sarah & Moore, Spencer & Harper, Sam & Lynch, John, 2010. "National female literacy, individual socio-economic status, and maternal health care use in sub-Saharan Africa," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(11), pages 1958-1963, December.
    6. Luginaah, Isaac N. & Kangmennaang, Joseph & Fallah, Mosoka & Dahn, Bernice & Kateh, Francis & Nyenswah, Tolbert, 2016. "Timing and utilization of antenatal care services in Liberia: Understanding the pre-Ebola epidemic context," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 75-86.
    7. Shandana Dar & Uzma Afzal, 2015. "Education and Maternal Health in Pakistan: The Pathways of Influence," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 1-34, July-Dec.

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