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Leila Agha

Personal Details

First Name:Leila
Middle Name:
Last Name:Agha
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pag166
http://sites.google.com/site/leilaagha/

Affiliation

Economics Department
Dartmouth College

Hanover, New Hampshire (United States)
http://www.dartmouth.edu/~economic/

:

6106 Rockefeller Center, Hanover, NH 03755-3514
RePEc:edi:eddarus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Leila Agha & Keith Marzilli Ericson & Kimberley H. Geissler & James B. Rebitzer, 2018. "Team Formation and Performance: Evidence from Healthcare Referral Networks," NBER Working Papers 24338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Leila Agha & Brigham Frandsen & James B. Rebitzer, 2017. "Causes and Consequences of Fragmented Care Delivery: Theory, Evidence, and Public Policy," NBER Working Papers 23078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Leila Agha & David Molitor, 2015. "The Local Influence of Pioneer Investigators on Technology Adoption: Evidence from New Cancer Drugs," NBER Working Papers 20878, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Jason Abaluck & Leila Agha & Christopher Kabrhel & Ali Raja & Arjun Venkatesh, 2014. "Negative Tests and the Efficiency of Medical Care: What Determines Heterogeneity in Imaging Behavior?," NBER Working Papers 19956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Jason Abaluck & Leila Agha & Chris Kabrhel & Ali Raja & Arjun Venkatesh, 2016. "The Determinants of Productivity in Medical Testing: Intensity and Allocation of Care," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(12), pages 3730-3764, December.
  2. Agha, Leila, 2014. "The effects of health information technology on the costs and quality of medical care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 19-30.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Leila Agha & David Molitor, 2015. "The Local Influence of Pioneer Investigators on Technology Adoption: Evidence from New Cancer Drugs," NBER Working Papers 20878, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 12th March 2018
      by Sam Watson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2018-03-12 12:00:42

Working papers

  1. Leila Agha & Brigham Frandsen & James B. Rebitzer, 2017. "Causes and Consequences of Fragmented Care Delivery: Theory, Evidence, and Public Policy," NBER Working Papers 23078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Zeltzer, Dan, 2017. "Gender Homophily in Referral Networks: Consequences for the Medicare Physician Earnings Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 11230, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Erin Johnson & M. Marit Rehavi & David C. Chan, Jr & Daniela Carusi, 2016. "A Doctor Will See You Now: Physician-Patient Relationships and Clinical Decisions," NBER Working Papers 22666, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Leila Agha & Keith Marzilli Ericson & Kimberley H. Geissler & James B. Rebitzer, 2018. "Team Formation and Performance: Evidence from Healthcare Referral Networks," NBER Working Papers 24338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Leila Agha & David Molitor, 2015. "The Local Influence of Pioneer Investigators on Technology Adoption: Evidence from New Cancer Drugs," NBER Working Papers 20878, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Kenneth J. Arrow & Kamran Bilir & Alan T. Sorensen, 2017. "The Impact of Information Technology on the Diffusion of New Pharmaceuticals," NBER Working Papers 23257, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Jason Abaluck & Leila Agha & Christopher Kabrhel & Ali Raja & Arjun Venkatesh, 2014. "Negative Tests and the Efficiency of Medical Care: What Determines Heterogeneity in Imaging Behavior?," NBER Working Papers 19956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Janet Currie & W. Bentley MacLeod, 2017. "Diagnosing Expertise: Human Capital, Decision Making, and Performance among Physicians," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 1-43.
    2. Alexander, Diane, 2017. "How do Doctors Respond to Incentives? Unintended Consequences of Paying Doctors to Reduce Costs," Working Paper Series WP-2017-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    3. Gautam Gowrisankaran & Keith A. Joiner & Pierre-Thomas Léger, 2017. "Physician Practice Style and Healthcare Costs: Evidence from Emergency Departments," NBER Working Papers 24155, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Rudy Douven & Minke Remmerswaal & Robin Zoutenbier, 2015. "Do Extrinsically Motivated Mental Health Care Providers Have Better Treatment Outcomes?," CPB Discussion Paper 319, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

Articles

  1. Jason Abaluck & Leila Agha & Chris Kabrhel & Ali Raja & Arjun Venkatesh, 2016. "The Determinants of Productivity in Medical Testing: Intensity and Allocation of Care," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(12), pages 3730-3764, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Amitabh Chandra & Douglas O. Staiger, 2017. "Identifying Sources of Inefficiency in Health Care," NBER Working Papers 24035, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Agha, Leila, 2014. "The effects of health information technology on the costs and quality of medical care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 19-30.

    Cited by:

    1. Avi Goldfarb & Catherine Tucker, 2012. "Privacy and Innovation," Innovation Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(1), pages 65-90.
    2. David Dranove & Christopher Forman & Avi Goldfarb & Shane Greenstein, 2012. "The Trillion Dollar Conundrum: Complementarities and Health Information Technology," NBER Working Papers 18281, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. James B. Rebitzer & Mark E. Votruba, 2011. "Organizational Economics and Physician Practices," NBER Working Papers 17535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Spyros Arvanitis & Euripidis N. Loukis, 2014. "Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals," KOF Working papers 14-366, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    5. Adam Sacarny, 2018. "Adoption and Learning Across Hospitals: The Case of a Revenue-Generating Practice," NBER Working Papers 24497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jinhyung Lee & Jeffrey S. McCullough & Robert J. Town, 2012. "The Impact of Health Information Technology on Hospital Productivity," NBER Working Papers 18025, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Gaggl, P & Wright, GC, 2014. "A Short-Run View of What Computers Do: Evidence from a UK Tax Incentive," Economics Discussion Papers 10012, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    8. Jeffrey S. McCullough & Stephen Parente & Robert Town, 2013. "Health Information Technology and Patient Outcomes: The Role of Organizational and Informational Complementarities," NBER Working Papers 18684, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Chad Syverson, 2017. "Challenges to Mismeasurement Explanations for the US Productivity Slowdown," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 165-186, Spring.
    10. Amalia R. Miller & Catherine Tucker, 2016. "Frontiers of Health Policy: Digital Data and Personalized Medicine," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 17, pages 49-75 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Seth Freedman & Haizhen Lin & Jeffrey Prince, 2015. "Information Technology and Patient Health: Analyzing Outcomes, Populations, and Mechanisms," NBER Working Papers 21389, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Dranove, David & Garthwaite, Craig & Li, Bingyang & Ody, Christopher, 2015. "Investment subsidies and the adoption of electronic medical records in hospitals," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 309-319.
    13. Seth Freedman & Haizhen Lin & Jeffrey T. Prince, 2014. "Information Technology and Patient Health: An Expanded Analysis of Outcomes, Populations, and Mechanisms," Working Papers 2014-02, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
    14. Seth Freedman & Haizhen Lin & Jeff Prince, 2016. "Does Competition Lead to Agglomeration or Dispersion in EMR Vendor Decisions?," Working Papers 16-19, NET Institute.
    15. Amalia R. Miller & Catherine E. Tucker, 2011. "Can Health Care Information Technology Save Babies?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(2), pages 289-324.
    16. Spyros Arvanitis & Euripidis N. Loukis, 2016. "Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals: an exploratory study," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(4), pages 403-418, May.
    17. David Dranove & Craig Garthwaite & Bingyang Li & Christopher Ody, 2014. "Investment Subsidies and the Adoption of Electronic Medical Records in Hospitals," NBER Working Papers 20553, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Kenneth J. Arrow & Kamran Bilir & Alan T. Sorensen, 2017. "The Impact of Information Technology on the Diffusion of New Pharmaceuticals," NBER Working Papers 23257, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2014-03-15 2017-02-05 2018-03-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2018-03-19. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2018-03-19. Author is listed

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